skip to main content
OSTI.GOV title logo U.S. Department of Energy
Office of Scientific and Technical Information

Title: Electrodeposition of nickel from low temperature sulfamate electrolytes.Part 1 :Electrochemistry and film stress.

Abstract

The film stress of Ni films deposited at near-ambient temperatures from sulfamate electrolytes was studied. The particulate filtering of the electrolyte, a routine industrial practice, becomes an important deposition parameter at lower bath temperatures. At 28 C, elevated tensile film stress develops at low current densities (<10 mA/cm{sup 2}) if the electrolyte is filtered. Filtering at higher current densities has a negligible effect on film stress. A similar though less pronounced trend is observed at 32 C. Sulfate-based Ni plating baths display similar film stress sensitivity to filtering, suggesting that this is a general effect for Ni electrodeposition. It is shown that filtering does not significantly change the current efficiency or the pH near the surface during deposition. The observed changes in film stress are thus attributed not to adsorbed hydrogen but instead to the effects of filtering on the formation and concentration of polyborate species due to the decreased solubility of boric acid at near-ambient temperatures.

Authors:
;  [1]; ;
  1. (IBM/T.J. Watson Research Center, Yorktown Heights, NY)
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Sandia National Laboratories
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE
OSTI Identifier:
875966
Report Number(s):
SAND2005-6077
TRN: US200604%%278
DOE Contract Number:  
AC04-94AL85000
Resource Type:
Technical Report
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
08 HYDROGEN; BORIC ACID; DEPOSITION; EFFICIENCY; ELECTROCHEMISTRY; ELECTRODEPOSITION; ELECTROLYTES; HYDROGEN; NICKEL; PARTICULATES; PLATING; SENSITIVITY; SOLUBILITY; Films.; Electrodes-Materials.; Electrolytes-Analysis.; Electrodes-Surfaces.

Citation Formats

Hachman, John T., Kelly, J.J., Talin, Albert Alec, and Goods, Steven Howard. Electrodeposition of nickel from low temperature sulfamate electrolytes.Part 1 :Electrochemistry and film stress.. United States: N. p., 2005. Web. doi:10.2172/875966.
Hachman, John T., Kelly, J.J., Talin, Albert Alec, & Goods, Steven Howard. Electrodeposition of nickel from low temperature sulfamate electrolytes.Part 1 :Electrochemistry and film stress.. United States. doi:10.2172/875966.
Hachman, John T., Kelly, J.J., Talin, Albert Alec, and Goods, Steven Howard. Tue . "Electrodeposition of nickel from low temperature sulfamate electrolytes.Part 1 :Electrochemistry and film stress.". United States. doi:10.2172/875966. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/875966.
@article{osti_875966,
title = {Electrodeposition of nickel from low temperature sulfamate electrolytes.Part 1 :Electrochemistry and film stress.},
author = {Hachman, John T. and Kelly, J.J. and Talin, Albert Alec and Goods, Steven Howard},
abstractNote = {The film stress of Ni films deposited at near-ambient temperatures from sulfamate electrolytes was studied. The particulate filtering of the electrolyte, a routine industrial practice, becomes an important deposition parameter at lower bath temperatures. At 28 C, elevated tensile film stress develops at low current densities (<10 mA/cm{sup 2}) if the electrolyte is filtered. Filtering at higher current densities has a negligible effect on film stress. A similar though less pronounced trend is observed at 32 C. Sulfate-based Ni plating baths display similar film stress sensitivity to filtering, suggesting that this is a general effect for Ni electrodeposition. It is shown that filtering does not significantly change the current efficiency or the pH near the surface during deposition. The observed changes in film stress are thus attributed not to adsorbed hydrogen but instead to the effects of filtering on the formation and concentration of polyborate species due to the decreased solubility of boric acid at near-ambient temperatures.},
doi = {10.2172/875966},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {Tue Nov 01 00:00:00 EST 2005},
month = {Tue Nov 01 00:00:00 EST 2005}
}

Technical Report:

Save / Share: