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Title: 2005 Tour de Sol: The Sustainable Energy and Transportation Festival and Competition

Abstract

This report gives a summary of the 2005Tour de Sol: The Sustainable Energy and Transportation Festival and Competition. It lists our objectives, what we did, and an analysis of how we met our objectives. An 80-page report with a list of verified print, radio and TV media coverage, and copies of selected news clips and web media coverage is available at the NESEA office for review.

Authors:
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Northeast Sustainable Energy Association, Inc., Greenfield, MA
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE); USDOE - Office of Solar Thermal, Biomass Power, and Hydrogen Technologies (EE-13)
OSTI Identifier:
875402
Report Number(s):
DOE GO14267
TRN: US200712%%6
DOE Contract Number:
FG36-04GO14267
Resource Type:
Technical Report
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
08 HYDROGEN; 32 ENERGY CONSERVATION, CONSUMPTION, AND UTILIZATION; HYDROGEN FUELS; SUSTAINABLE DEVELOPMENT; TRANSPORTATION SYSTEMS; SOLAR THERMAL CONVERSION; Tour de Sol, The Green Transportation Festival, Hydrogen economy education, New York State

Citation Formats

Nancy Hazard. 2005 Tour de Sol: The Sustainable Energy and Transportation Festival and Competition. United States: N. p., 2005. Web. doi:10.2172/875402.
Nancy Hazard. 2005 Tour de Sol: The Sustainable Energy and Transportation Festival and Competition. United States. doi:10.2172/875402.
Nancy Hazard. 2005. "2005 Tour de Sol: The Sustainable Energy and Transportation Festival and Competition". United States. doi:10.2172/875402. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/875402.
@article{osti_875402,
title = {2005 Tour de Sol: The Sustainable Energy and Transportation Festival and Competition},
author = {Nancy Hazard},
abstractNote = {This report gives a summary of the 2005Tour de Sol: The Sustainable Energy and Transportation Festival and Competition. It lists our objectives, what we did, and an analysis of how we met our objectives. An 80-page report with a list of verified print, radio and TV media coverage, and copies of selected news clips and web media coverage is available at the NESEA office for review.},
doi = {10.2172/875402},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = 2005,
month = 5
}

Technical Report:

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  • A flow chart depicting energy flow in the transportation sector of the United States economy in 2005 has been constructed from publicly available data and estimates of national energy use patterns. Approximately 31,000 trillion British Thermal Units (trBTUs) of energy were used throughout the United States in transportation activities. Vehicles used in these activities include automobiles, motorcycles, trucks, buses, airplanes, rail, and ships. The transportation sector is powered primarily by petroleum-derived fuels (gasoline, diesel and jet fuel). Biomass-derived fuels, electricity and natural gas-derived fuels are also used. The flow patterns represent a comprehensive systems view of energy used within themore » transportation sector.« less
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  • Transportation consumes 68% of the oil used in the U.S. With the security and environmental risks inherent in the US dependence on oil, coupled with the inevitable need to find new sources of fuel, it will be up to today's students to make the important transition away from a transportation system powered by oil to one powered by renewable energy sources. NESEA's 1999 - 2002 Future Wheels for a Sustainable America program worked for increased involvement of teachers, students, and their parents in learning about alternative fueled vehicles and transportation issues in their community, and provided Clean Cities Coordinators withmore » access to educational materials on alternative fueled vehicles and transportation issues that are acceptable to teachers and school systems. To accomplish this, NESEA (1) developed and distributed a new high school unit on the Clean Cities theme of alternative fueled vehicles, (2) organized and held workshops for teachers on these topics, (3) matched state and federal education standards with other instructional resources and materials dealing with these topics, (4) published a resource guide and searchable Web-accessible database for K-12 teachers, and (5) presented these resources to Clean Cities organizers at three conferences. Questionnaire results received from the teachers who pilot tested the high school unit are included.« less