skip to main content
OSTI.GOV title logo U.S. Department of Energy
Office of Scientific and Technical Information

Title: Interpreting environmental signals from the coralline sponge Astrosclera willeyana

Abstract

Coralline sponges (sclerosponges) have been proposed as a new source for paleo subsurface temperature reconstructions by utilizing methods developed for reef-building corals. However unlike corals, coralline sponges do not have density variations making age determination difficult. In this study we examined multiple elemental rations (B, Mg, Sr, Ba, U) in the coralline sponge Astrosclera willeyana. We also measured skeletal density profiles along the outer ''living'' edge of the sponges and this data indicates significant thickening of skeletal material over intervals of 2-3 mm or 2-3 years. This suggests that any skeletal recovered environmental record from Astrosclera willeyana is an integration of signals over a 2-3 year period. Sponge Sr/Ca seemed to hold the most promise as a recorder of water temperature and we compared Sr/Ca from 2 sponges in the Great Barrier Reef and one from Truk in Micronesia to their respective sea surface temperature record. The correlations were not that strong ({approx} r=-0.5) but they were significant. It appears that the signal smoothing due to thickening or perhaps even some biologic control on Sr skeletal partitioning limits the use of Sr/Ca as an indicator of water temperature in Astrosclera willeyana.

Authors:
; ;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE
OSTI Identifier:
875375
Report Number(s):
UCRL-JRNL-205016
Journal ID: ISSN 0031-0182; PPPYAB; TRN: US200603%%115
DOE Contract Number:  
W-7405-ENG-48
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Palaeogeography, Palaeoclimatology, Palaeoecology; Journal Volume: 228; Journal Issue: 1-2
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
54 ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES; CORALS; MICRONESIA; REEFS; SEAS; WATER

Citation Formats

Fallon, S J, McCulloch, M T, and Guilderson, T P. Interpreting environmental signals from the coralline sponge Astrosclera willeyana. United States: N. p., 2004. Web.
Fallon, S J, McCulloch, M T, & Guilderson, T P. Interpreting environmental signals from the coralline sponge Astrosclera willeyana. United States.
Fallon, S J, McCulloch, M T, and Guilderson, T P. Wed . "Interpreting environmental signals from the coralline sponge Astrosclera willeyana". United States. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/875375.
@article{osti_875375,
title = {Interpreting environmental signals from the coralline sponge Astrosclera willeyana},
author = {Fallon, S J and McCulloch, M T and Guilderson, T P},
abstractNote = {Coralline sponges (sclerosponges) have been proposed as a new source for paleo subsurface temperature reconstructions by utilizing methods developed for reef-building corals. However unlike corals, coralline sponges do not have density variations making age determination difficult. In this study we examined multiple elemental rations (B, Mg, Sr, Ba, U) in the coralline sponge Astrosclera willeyana. We also measured skeletal density profiles along the outer ''living'' edge of the sponges and this data indicates significant thickening of skeletal material over intervals of 2-3 mm or 2-3 years. This suggests that any skeletal recovered environmental record from Astrosclera willeyana is an integration of signals over a 2-3 year period. Sponge Sr/Ca seemed to hold the most promise as a recorder of water temperature and we compared Sr/Ca from 2 sponges in the Great Barrier Reef and one from Truk in Micronesia to their respective sea surface temperature record. The correlations were not that strong ({approx} r=-0.5) but they were significant. It appears that the signal smoothing due to thickening or perhaps even some biologic control on Sr skeletal partitioning limits the use of Sr/Ca as an indicator of water temperature in Astrosclera willeyana.},
doi = {},
journal = {Palaeogeography, Palaeoclimatology, Palaeoecology},
number = 1-2,
volume = 228,
place = {United States},
year = {Wed Jun 30 00:00:00 EDT 2004},
month = {Wed Jun 30 00:00:00 EDT 2004}
}