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Title: Signal Transduction Pathways that Regulate CAB Gene Expression

Abstract

The process of chloroplast differentiation, involves the coordinate regulation of many nuclear and chloroplast genes. The cues for the initiation of this developmental program are both extrinsic (e.g., light) and intrinsic (cell-type and plastid signals). During this project period, we utilized a molecular genetic approach to select for Arabidopsis mutants that did not respond properly to environmental light conditions, as well as mutants that were unable to perceive plastid damage. These latter mutants, called gun mutants, define two retrograde signaling pathways that regulate nuclear gene expression in response to chloroplasts. A major finding was to identify a signal from chloroplasts that regulates nuclear gene transcription. This signal is the build-up of Mg-Protoporphyrin IX, a key intermediate of the chlorophyll biosynthetic pathway. The signaling pathways downstream of this signal are currently being studied. Completion of this project has provided an increased understanding of the input signals and retrograde signaling pathways that control nuclear gene expression in response to the functional state of chloroplasts. These studies should ultimately influence our abilities to manipulate plant growth and development, and will aid in the understanding of the developmental control of photosynthesis.

Authors:
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
The Salk Institute for Biological Studies, La Jolla, California
Sponsoring Org.:
SC-17
OSTI Identifier:
862356
DOE Contract Number:
FG03-89ER13993
Resource Type:
Technical Report
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
59 BASIC BIOLOGICAL SCIENCES; ARABIDOPSIS; CHLOROPHYLL; CHLOROPLASTS; FUNCTIONALS; GENES; GENETICS; MUTANTS; PHOTOSYNTHESIS; PLANT GROWTH; REGULATIONS; TRANSCRIPTION; Chloroplast development, photosynthesis, plants

Citation Formats

Chory, Joanne. Signal Transduction Pathways that Regulate CAB Gene Expression. United States: N. p., 2006. Web. doi:10.2172/862356.
Chory, Joanne. Signal Transduction Pathways that Regulate CAB Gene Expression. United States. doi:10.2172/862356.
Chory, Joanne. Mon . "Signal Transduction Pathways that Regulate CAB Gene Expression". United States. doi:10.2172/862356. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/862356.
@article{osti_862356,
title = {Signal Transduction Pathways that Regulate CAB Gene Expression},
author = {Chory, Joanne},
abstractNote = {The process of chloroplast differentiation, involves the coordinate regulation of many nuclear and chloroplast genes. The cues for the initiation of this developmental program are both extrinsic (e.g., light) and intrinsic (cell-type and plastid signals). During this project period, we utilized a molecular genetic approach to select for Arabidopsis mutants that did not respond properly to environmental light conditions, as well as mutants that were unable to perceive plastid damage. These latter mutants, called gun mutants, define two retrograde signaling pathways that regulate nuclear gene expression in response to chloroplasts. A major finding was to identify a signal from chloroplasts that regulates nuclear gene transcription. This signal is the build-up of Mg-Protoporphyrin IX, a key intermediate of the chlorophyll biosynthetic pathway. The signaling pathways downstream of this signal are currently being studied. Completion of this project has provided an increased understanding of the input signals and retrograde signaling pathways that control nuclear gene expression in response to the functional state of chloroplasts. These studies should ultimately influence our abilities to manipulate plant growth and development, and will aid in the understanding of the developmental control of photosynthesis.},
doi = {10.2172/862356},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {Mon Jan 16 00:00:00 EST 2006},
month = {Mon Jan 16 00:00:00 EST 2006}
}

Technical Report:

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  • The process of chloroplast differentiation, involves the coordinate regulation of many nuclear and chloroplast genes. The cues for the initiation of this developmental program are both extrinsic (e.g., light) and intrinsic (cell-type and plastid signals). During this project period, we utilized a molecular genetic approach to select for Arabidopsis mutants that did not respond properly to environmental light conditions, as well as mutants that were unable to perceive plastid damage. These latter mutants, called gun mutants, define two retrograde signaling pathways that regulate nuclear gene expression in response to chloroplasts. A major finding was to identify a signal from chloroplastsmore » that regulates nuclear gene transcription. This signal is the build-up of Mg-Protoporphyrin IX, a key intermediate of the chlorophyll biosynthetic pathway. The signaling pathways downstream of this signal are currently being studied. Completion of this project has provided an increased understanding of the input signals and retrograde signaling pathways that control nuclear gene expression in response to the functional state of chloroplasts. These studies should ultimately influence our abilities to manipulate plant growth and development, and will aid in the understanding of the developmental control of photosynthesis.« less
  • We have completed the initial genetic and phenotypic characterization of several classes of new mutants that affect CAB gene expression. The doc mutants (for dark overexpression of cab) are characterized by elevated levels of CAB gene expression in the dark; however, unlike the previously isolated de-etiolated mutants (also isolated in my lab), the doc mutants still appear etiolated. The doc alleles define 3 loci, each of which maps to a separate chromosome. The details of the mutant isolation scheme and the genetic and phenotypic description of these new mutants are described. The second class of mutants, the gun mutants (formore » genomes uncoupled) show accumulation of CAB mRNA in the absence of chloroplast gene expression and development. Thus, the normally tightly coordinated expression between the chloroplast and nuclear genes that encode chloroplast-destined proteins has been uncoupled. We have shown that the Arabidopsis HY3 locus encodes the type B phytochrome apoprotein gene and have characterized the phenotypes of null hy3 alleles to ascertain a role for this phytochrome in Arabidopsis development. We have also isolated and characterized a number of alleles of the phytochrome A gene.« less
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  • Multiple signal transduction pathways interact in FRTL5 cells to promote thyroid follicular cell differentiated function and cell proliferation. In these cells, TSH is a tissue-specific mitogen that promotes DNA synthesis primarily through activation of adenylate cyclase. To further test the role of adenylate cyclase in regulating cell growth and differentiated function we have introduced into FRTL5 the human beta 2-adrenergic receptor (BAR) complementary DNA and have studied the ability of isoproterenol, alone and in combination with insulin-like growth factor I (IGF-I), to stimulate cAMP accumulation, iodide transport, (3H)thymidine incorporation into DNA, and cell growth. Wild-type FRTL5 were infected with amore » PLJ retroviral construct containing the BAR in either a sense (FRTL BAR) or antisense (FRTL RBAR) orientation, and cell populations were selected on the basis of resistance to the antibiotic geneticin. FRTL BAR expressed approximately 1.3 x 10(5) high affinity binding sites per cell for the beta 2-specific ligand, CGP-12177, while neither FRTL5 wild-type nor RBAR cells demonstrated any specific binding. FRTL BAR had significantly higher levels of intracellular cAMP, (3H)thymidine incorporation, and iodide uptake in the absence of added isoproterenol than FRTL RBAR or wild-type cells. In FRTL BAR, but not RBAR cells, isoproterenol stimulated a dose-dependent accumulation of cAMP, iodide uptake, (3H)thymidine incorporation, and cell growth. FRTL BAR and RBAR cells were equally responsive to TSH and to IGF-I. Isoproterenol enhanced the ability of IGF-I to stimulate (3H)thymidine incorporation in BAR but not RBAR cells. Isoproterenol partially inhibited the ability of TSH to stimulate cAMP generation and DNA synthesis.« less
  • The promoter of the gene encoding a cytoplasmic guanylate-binding (GBP) contains two overlapping elements: the interferon stimulation response element (ISRE), which mediates alpha interferon (IFN-{alpha})-dependent transcription, and the IFN-{gamma} activation site (GAS), which is required for INF-{gamma}-mediated stimulation. The ISRE binds a factor called ISGF-3 that is activated by IFN-{alpha} but not by IFN-{gamma}. The GAS binds a protein that is activated by IFN-{gamma}, which the authors have termed GAF. The authors now find that the GAS is also an IFN-{alpha}-responsive element in vivo and that IFN-{alpha} (in addition to activating ISGF-3) rapidly activates a GAS-binding factor, the IFN-{alpha} activationmore » factor (AAF). The AAF has characteristics very similar to those of the previously described GAF. Through the use of inhibitors of protein synthesis and inhibitors of protein kinases, the activation conditions of AAF, GAF, and ISGF-3 could be distinguished. Therefore, not only do IFN-{alpha} and IFN-{gamma} stimulate transcription of GBP through different receptors linked to different signaling molecules, but occupation of the IFN-{alpha} receptor apparently leads to the rapid activation of two different DNA-binding proteins through the use of different intracellular pathways.« less