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Title: Multiscale Stochastic Simulation and Modeling

Abstract

Acceleration driven instabilities of fluid mixing layers include the classical cases of Rayleigh-Taylor instability, driven by a steady acceleration and Richtmyer-Meshkov instability, driven by an impulsive acceleration. Our program starts with high resolution methods of numerical simulation of two (or more) distinct fluids, continues with analytic analysis of these solutions, and the derivation of averaged equations. A striking achievement has been the systematic agreement we obtained between simulation and experiment by using a high resolution numerical method and improved physical modeling, with surface tension. Our study is accompanies by analysis using stochastic modeling and averaged equations for the multiphase problem. We have quantified the error and uncertainty using statistical modeling methods.

Authors:
;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
RESEARCH FOUNDATION OF SUNY
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Science (SC)
OSTI Identifier:
862194
Report Number(s):
DOE/ER25084
TRN: US200710%%299
DOE Contract Number:
FG02-90ER25084
Resource Type:
Technical Report
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
99 GENERAL AND MISCELLANEOUS//MATHEMATICS, COMPUTING, AND INFORMATION SCIENCE; ACCELERATION; INSTABILITY; RAYLEIGH-TAYLOR INSTABILITY; RESOLUTION; SIMULATION; SURFACE TENSION; Turbulence Mix, Interface Instabilities, Front Tracking

Citation Formats

James Glimm, and Xiaolin Li. Multiscale Stochastic Simulation and Modeling. United States: N. p., 2006. Web. doi:10.2172/862194.
James Glimm, & Xiaolin Li. Multiscale Stochastic Simulation and Modeling. United States. doi:10.2172/862194.
James Glimm, and Xiaolin Li. Tue . "Multiscale Stochastic Simulation and Modeling". United States. doi:10.2172/862194. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/862194.
@article{osti_862194,
title = {Multiscale Stochastic Simulation and Modeling},
author = {James Glimm and Xiaolin Li},
abstractNote = {Acceleration driven instabilities of fluid mixing layers include the classical cases of Rayleigh-Taylor instability, driven by a steady acceleration and Richtmyer-Meshkov instability, driven by an impulsive acceleration. Our program starts with high resolution methods of numerical simulation of two (or more) distinct fluids, continues with analytic analysis of these solutions, and the derivation of averaged equations. A striking achievement has been the systematic agreement we obtained between simulation and experiment by using a high resolution numerical method and improved physical modeling, with surface tension. Our study is accompanies by analysis using stochastic modeling and averaged equations for the multiphase problem. We have quantified the error and uncertainty using statistical modeling methods.},
doi = {10.2172/862194},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {Tue Jan 10 00:00:00 EST 2006},
month = {Tue Jan 10 00:00:00 EST 2006}
}

Technical Report:

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