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Title: G-Plus Report to Judel Products: Spectral Analysis and Imaging of Colored Glasses

Abstract

Redox state is one of the most important factors that affect color of glasses. Recently, optical properties and redox state of the glass melts have been studied at TNO by A.J. Faber [1]. Spectral measurements up to 4 {micro}m into the infrared region were taken. The focus of similar studies [2] was on the redox state of iron. In glassware production, the control of color is mainly dependent upon the experience of the operators. When the color varies due to changes in processing conditions, batching or furnace contamination, usually little can be done but to scrap the entire batch. This can result in significant down time and waste of energy to melt and refine the glass. For small glass companies, detecting out-of-specification color variation early in the melting process means savings on labor and energy costs. In larger color glass operations, early detection may provide means to correct or save the batch. Monitoring the redox state of the glass melt can be used to effectively control the quality of glass products. An in-line redox sensor has been tested in industrial environment [3]. Thermal emission spectroscopy is a non-contact, real-time sensing technique. The collection of a spectrum takes only a fewmore » seconds or less. This may allow on-line analysis of the glass melt or hot glass products. For a specific glass product, a series of spectra with different processing parameters could be collected and analyzed. The sensing system would be able to detect a deviation from the normal conditions and signal the operator a change has occurred. The primary goal of this GPLUS effort is to find a practical solution for color monitoring. In this project, we proposed to conduct initial experiments of spectral characterization of colored glasses from the designated glass industry members of the Society for Glass Science and Practices. The work plan contained three stages: (1) Obtain glass samples and use spectroscopy analysis at ORNL to measure basic spectral characteristics of various glass products; (2) collect emission spectra of the glasses using single-point spectrometers (UV to 2.5 microns) from glass melts; (3) Using a spectral imaging device (3-5 microns) at ORNL to obtain 2D hyper-spectra images to evaluate the emission of glass melts.« less

Authors:
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE
OSTI Identifier:
861682
Report Number(s):
ORNL/TM-2005/91
TRN: US200617%%11
DOE Contract Number:  
DE-AC05-00OR22725
Resource Type:
Technical Report
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
36 MATERIALS SCIENCE; COLOR; CONTAMINATION; DETECTION; EMISSION SPECTRA; EMISSION SPECTROSCOPY; ENERGY ACCOUNTING; GLASS; GLASS INDUSTRY; IRON; MELTING; MONITORING; OPTICAL PROPERTIES; SCRAP; SPECTRA; SPECTROMETERS; SPECTROSCOPY; WASTES

Citation Formats

Wang, H. G-Plus Report to Judel Products: Spectral Analysis and Imaging of Colored Glasses. United States: N. p., 2005. Web. doi:10.2172/861682.
Wang, H. G-Plus Report to Judel Products: Spectral Analysis and Imaging of Colored Glasses. United States. doi:10.2172/861682.
Wang, H. Mon . "G-Plus Report to Judel Products: Spectral Analysis and Imaging of Colored Glasses". United States. doi:10.2172/861682. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/861682.
@article{osti_861682,
title = {G-Plus Report to Judel Products: Spectral Analysis and Imaging of Colored Glasses},
author = {Wang, H},
abstractNote = {Redox state is one of the most important factors that affect color of glasses. Recently, optical properties and redox state of the glass melts have been studied at TNO by A.J. Faber [1]. Spectral measurements up to 4 {micro}m into the infrared region were taken. The focus of similar studies [2] was on the redox state of iron. In glassware production, the control of color is mainly dependent upon the experience of the operators. When the color varies due to changes in processing conditions, batching or furnace contamination, usually little can be done but to scrap the entire batch. This can result in significant down time and waste of energy to melt and refine the glass. For small glass companies, detecting out-of-specification color variation early in the melting process means savings on labor and energy costs. In larger color glass operations, early detection may provide means to correct or save the batch. Monitoring the redox state of the glass melt can be used to effectively control the quality of glass products. An in-line redox sensor has been tested in industrial environment [3]. Thermal emission spectroscopy is a non-contact, real-time sensing technique. The collection of a spectrum takes only a few seconds or less. This may allow on-line analysis of the glass melt or hot glass products. For a specific glass product, a series of spectra with different processing parameters could be collected and analyzed. The sensing system would be able to detect a deviation from the normal conditions and signal the operator a change has occurred. The primary goal of this GPLUS effort is to find a practical solution for color monitoring. In this project, we proposed to conduct initial experiments of spectral characterization of colored glasses from the designated glass industry members of the Society for Glass Science and Practices. The work plan contained three stages: (1) Obtain glass samples and use spectroscopy analysis at ORNL to measure basic spectral characteristics of various glass products; (2) collect emission spectra of the glasses using single-point spectrometers (UV to 2.5 microns) from glass melts; (3) Using a spectral imaging device (3-5 microns) at ORNL to obtain 2D hyper-spectra images to evaluate the emission of glass melts.},
doi = {10.2172/861682},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {2005},
month = {6}
}