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Title: Lied Animal Shelter Animal campus Renewable Energy Demonstration Project

Abstract

The Animal Shelter campus plan includes a new adoption center coupled with a dog adoption park, a wellness/veterinary technician education center, a show arena, and an addition to the existing shelter that will accommodate all animal control and sheltering for the Las Vegas Valley. The new facility will provide a sophisticated and innovative presentation of the animals to be adopted in an attempt to improve the public's perception of shelter animals. Additionally, the Regional Animal Campus will be a ''green building'', embodying a design intent on balancing environmental responsiveness, resource efficiency and cultural and community sensitivity. Designing an energy-efficient building helps reduce pollution from burning fossil fuels, reduce disturbance of natural habitats for the harvesting of resources and minimizes global warming. The project will be a leader in the use of renewable energy by relying on photovoltaic panels, wind turbines, and solar collectors to produce a portion of the project's energy needs The building will operate more efficiently in comparison to a typical shelter through the use of monitoring and specialized cooling/heating equipment. Windows bringing in natural daylight will reduce the center's demand for electricity.

Authors:
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Lied Animal Foundation
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)
OSTI Identifier:
861493
Report Number(s):
001
TRN: US200710%%241
DOE Contract Number:
FG36-04GO14262
Resource Type:
Technical Report
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
01 COAL, LIGNITE, AND PEAT; 14 SOLAR ENERGY; 17 WIND ENERGY; 29 ENERGY PLANNING, POLICY AND ECONOMY; ANIMAL SHELTERS; ANIMALS; EDUCATION; EFFICIENCY; ELECTRICITY; FOSSIL FUELS; GREENHOUSE EFFECT; HARVESTING; MONITORING; POLLUTION; SENSITIVITY; SHELTERS; SOLAR COLLECTORS; WIND TURBINES; WINDOWS; Photovoltaics

Citation Formats

Randy Spitzmesser, AIA. Lied Animal Shelter Animal campus Renewable Energy Demonstration Project. United States: N. p., 2005. Web. doi:10.2172/861493.
Randy Spitzmesser, AIA. Lied Animal Shelter Animal campus Renewable Energy Demonstration Project. United States. doi:10.2172/861493.
Randy Spitzmesser, AIA. Tue . "Lied Animal Shelter Animal campus Renewable Energy Demonstration Project". United States. doi:10.2172/861493. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/861493.
@article{osti_861493,
title = {Lied Animal Shelter Animal campus Renewable Energy Demonstration Project},
author = {Randy Spitzmesser, AIA},
abstractNote = {The Animal Shelter campus plan includes a new adoption center coupled with a dog adoption park, a wellness/veterinary technician education center, a show arena, and an addition to the existing shelter that will accommodate all animal control and sheltering for the Las Vegas Valley. The new facility will provide a sophisticated and innovative presentation of the animals to be adopted in an attempt to improve the public's perception of shelter animals. Additionally, the Regional Animal Campus will be a ''green building'', embodying a design intent on balancing environmental responsiveness, resource efficiency and cultural and community sensitivity. Designing an energy-efficient building helps reduce pollution from burning fossil fuels, reduce disturbance of natural habitats for the harvesting of resources and minimizes global warming. The project will be a leader in the use of renewable energy by relying on photovoltaic panels, wind turbines, and solar collectors to produce a portion of the project's energy needs The building will operate more efficiently in comparison to a typical shelter through the use of monitoring and specialized cooling/heating equipment. Windows bringing in natural daylight will reduce the center's demand for electricity.},
doi = {10.2172/861493},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {Tue Nov 22 00:00:00 EST 2005},
month = {Tue Nov 22 00:00:00 EST 2005}
}

Technical Report:

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