skip to main content
OSTI.GOV title logo U.S. Department of Energy
Office of Scientific and Technical Information

Title: Achievement of Low Emissions by Engine Modification to Utilize Gas-to-Liquid Fuel and Advanced Emission Controls on a Class 8 Truck

Abstract

A 2002 Cummins ISM engine was modified to be optimized for operation on gas-to-liquid (GTL) fuel and advanced emission control devices. The engine modifications included increased exhaust gas recirculation (EGR), decreased compression ratio, and reshaped piston and bowl configuration.

Authors:
; ; ; ; ; ; ; ; ; ;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE
OSTI Identifier:
861423
Report Number(s):
NREL/CP-540-38220
Journal ID: ISSN 0148--7191; TRN: US200601%%860
DOE Contract Number:
AC36-99-GO10337
Resource Type:
Conference
Resource Relation:
Journal Volume: 1; Related Information: SAE Paper No. 2005-01-3766; Posted with permission. Presented at the 2005 SAE Powertrain & Fluid Systems Conference & Exhibition, October 2005, San Antonio, Texas
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
02 PETROLEUM; 32 ENERGY CONSERVATION, CONSUMPTION, AND UTILIZATION; 33 ADVANCED PROPULSION SYSTEMS; 54 ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES; COMPRESSION RATIO; CONFIGURATION; ENGINES; MODIFICATIONS; PISTONS; GAS-TO-LIQUID FUEL; GTL; CUMMINS ISM ENGINE; EMISSION CONTROL DEVICE; EXHAUST GAS RECIRCULATION; EGR; Transportation

Citation Formats

Alleman, T. L., Tennant, C. J., Hayes, R. R., Miyasato, M., Oshinuga, A., Barton, G., Rumminger, M., Duggal, V., Nelson, C., Ray, M., and Cherrillo, R. A. Achievement of Low Emissions by Engine Modification to Utilize Gas-to-Liquid Fuel and Advanced Emission Controls on a Class 8 Truck. United States: N. p., 2005. Web. doi:10.4271/2005-01-3766.
Alleman, T. L., Tennant, C. J., Hayes, R. R., Miyasato, M., Oshinuga, A., Barton, G., Rumminger, M., Duggal, V., Nelson, C., Ray, M., & Cherrillo, R. A. Achievement of Low Emissions by Engine Modification to Utilize Gas-to-Liquid Fuel and Advanced Emission Controls on a Class 8 Truck. United States. doi:10.4271/2005-01-3766.
Alleman, T. L., Tennant, C. J., Hayes, R. R., Miyasato, M., Oshinuga, A., Barton, G., Rumminger, M., Duggal, V., Nelson, C., Ray, M., and Cherrillo, R. A. Tue . "Achievement of Low Emissions by Engine Modification to Utilize Gas-to-Liquid Fuel and Advanced Emission Controls on a Class 8 Truck". United States. doi:10.4271/2005-01-3766. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/861423.
@article{osti_861423,
title = {Achievement of Low Emissions by Engine Modification to Utilize Gas-to-Liquid Fuel and Advanced Emission Controls on a Class 8 Truck},
author = {Alleman, T. L. and Tennant, C. J. and Hayes, R. R. and Miyasato, M. and Oshinuga, A. and Barton, G. and Rumminger, M. and Duggal, V. and Nelson, C. and Ray, M. and Cherrillo, R. A.},
abstractNote = {A 2002 Cummins ISM engine was modified to be optimized for operation on gas-to-liquid (GTL) fuel and advanced emission control devices. The engine modifications included increased exhaust gas recirculation (EGR), decreased compression ratio, and reshaped piston and bowl configuration.},
doi = {10.4271/2005-01-3766},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = 1,
place = {United States},
year = {Tue Nov 01 00:00:00 EST 2005},
month = {Tue Nov 01 00:00:00 EST 2005}
}

Conference:
Other availability
Please see Document Availability for additional information on obtaining the full-text document. Library patrons may search WorldCat to identify libraries that hold this conference proceeding.

Save / Share:
  • Fuel properties have had substantial impact on engine emissions. Fuel impact varies with engine technology. An assessment of fuel impact on future low emission designs was needed as part of an EMAEPA-API study effort
  • A fleet of six 2001 International Class 6 trucks operating in southern California was selected for an operability and emissions study using gas-to-liquid (GTL) fuel and catalyzed diesel particle filters (CDPF). Three vehicles were fueled with CARB specification diesel fuel and no emission control devices (current technology), and three vehicles were fueled with GTL fuel and retrofit with Johnson Matthey's CCRT diesel particulate filter. No engine modifications were made.
  • Historically, engine development activities have been controlled exclusively by market factors such as uprating or improved economics of first cost or cost of ownership. In the United States, the Clean Air Act was enacted in 1963 and amended in 1977 to include Stationary Engines. This law, and resulting regulations, have added a new dimension to engine development--the need for low NO /SUB x/ . Prior to 1977, spark-ignited, natural gas fueled, reciprocating engines produced NO /SUB x/ levels on the order of 15g/HPHR (20g/KWHR). As emissions control techniques were developed, the U.S. industry moved this NO /SUB x/ level downmore » to as low as 1.5 g/HPHR (2g/KWHR). All early equipment produced with emissions control incorporated a fuel consumption penalty. This paper describes the work and results of Cooper-Bessemer advanced ''Clean Burn'' engines, which result in both low emissions and improved fuel economy. The ''Clean Burn'' concept reduces NO /SUB x/ by combustion modification. The work reported upon in this paper now makes the Cooper-Bessemer ''Clean Burn'' combustion concept more attractive than our conventional combustion system based on fuel economy and overall smoothness of operations regardless of any required NO /SUB x/ controls. NO /SUB x/ levels lower than those of uncontrolled gas turbines are now possible.« less
  • Advanced coal-based power generation systems such as the British Coal Topping Cycle offer the potential for high-efficiency electricity generation with minimum environmental impact. An important component of the Topping cycle program is the gas turbine, for which development of a combustion system to burn low calorific value coal derived fuel gas, at a turbine inlet temperature of 1,260 C (2,300 F), with minimum pollutant emissions, is a key R and D issue. A phased combustor development program is underway burning low calorific value fuel gas (3.6--4.1 MJ/m[sup 3]) with low emissions, particularly NO[sub x] derived from fuel-bound nitrogen. The firstmore » phase of the combustor development program has now been completed using a generic tubo-annular, prototype combustor design. Tests were carried out at combustor loading and Mach numbers considerably greater than the initial design values. Combustor performance at these conditions was encouraging. The second phase of the program is currently in progress. This will assess, initially, an improved variant of the prototype combustor operating at conditions selected to represent a particular medium sized industrial gas turbine. This combustor will also be capable of operating using natural gas as an auxiliary fuel, to suite the start-up procedure for the Topping Cycle. The paper presents the Phase 1 test program results for the prototype combustor. Design of the modified combustor for Phase 2 of the development program is discussed, together with preliminary combustor performance results.« less