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Title: Laboratory Investigations in Support of Carbon Dioxide-Limestone Sequestration in the Ocean

Abstract

This semi-annual progress reports includes further findings on CO{sub 2}-in-Water (C/W) emulsions stabilized by fine particles. In previous semi-annual reports we described the formation of stable C/W emulsions using pulverized limestone (CaCO{sub 3}), flyash, beach sand, shale and lizardite, a rock rich in magnesium silicate. For the creation of these emulsions we used a High-Pressure Batch Reactor (HPBR) equipped with view windows for illumination and video camera recording. For deep ocean sequestration, a C/W emulsion using pulverized limestone may be the most suitable. (a) Limestone (mainly CaCO{sub 3}) is cheap and plentiful; (b) limestone is innocuous for marine organisms (in fact, it is the natural ingredient of shells and corals); (c) it buffers the carbonic acid that forms when CO{sub 2} dissolves in water. For large-scale sequestration of a CO{sub 2}/H{sub 2}O/CaCO{sub 3} emulsion a device is needed that mixes the ingredients, liquid carbon dioxide, seawater, and a slurry of pulverized limestone in seawater continuously, rather than incrementally as in a batch reactor. A practical mixing device is a Kenics-type static mixer. The static mixer has no moving parts, and the shear force for mixing is provided by the hydrostatic pressure of liquid CO{sub 2} and CaCO{sub 3} slurry inmore » the delivery pipes from the shore to the disposal depth. This semi-annual progress report is dedicated to the description of the static mixer and the results that have been obtained using a bench-scale static mixer for the continuous formation of a CO{sub 2}/H{sub 2}O/CaCO{sub 3} emulsion. The static mixer has an ID of 0.63 cm, length 23.5 cm, number of baffles 27. Under pressure, a slurry of CaCO{sub 3} in artificial seawater (3.5% by weight NaCl) and liquid CO{sub 2} are co-injected into the mixer. From the mixer, the resulting emulsion flows into a Jerguson cell with two oblong windows on opposite sides, then it is vented. A fully ported ball valve inserted after the Jerguson cell allows the emulsion to be stopped in the cell. In such a manner the emulsion can be photographed while it is flowing through the cell, or after it has stagnated in the cell. A slurry of 10 g/L CaCO{sub 3} (Sigma Chemicals C-4830 reagent grade) in artificial seawater, co-injected into the static mixer at a rate of 1.5 L/min with liquid CO{sub 2} at a rate of 150 mL/min, at temperature 5-10 C, pressure 10 MPa, produced an emulsion with mean globule diameter in the 70-100 {micro}m range. In a HPBR, using the same materials, proportions, temperature and pressure, mixed with a magnetic stir bar at 1300 rpm, the mean globule diameter is in the 200-300 {micro}m range. Evidently, the static mixer produces an emulsion with smaller globule diameters and narrower distribution of globule diameters than a batch reactor.« less

Authors:
; ; ; ; ; ; ;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
University of Massachusetts Lowell
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE
OSTI Identifier:
861379
DOE Contract Number:
FC26-02NT41441
Resource Type:
Technical Report
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
54 ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES; CARBON DIOXIDE; CALCIUM CARBONATES; CARBON SEQUESTRATION; MARINE DISPOSAL; MIXERS; DESIGN; PERFORMANCE; SEAWATER; SLURRIES; EMULSIONS

Citation Formats

Dan Golomb, Eugene Barry, David Ryan, Carl Lawton, Stephen Pennell, Peter Swett, Huishan Duan, and Michael Woods. Laboratory Investigations in Support of Carbon Dioxide-Limestone Sequestration in the Ocean. United States: N. p., 2005. Web. doi:10.2172/861379.
Dan Golomb, Eugene Barry, David Ryan, Carl Lawton, Stephen Pennell, Peter Swett, Huishan Duan, & Michael Woods. Laboratory Investigations in Support of Carbon Dioxide-Limestone Sequestration in the Ocean. United States. doi:10.2172/861379.
Dan Golomb, Eugene Barry, David Ryan, Carl Lawton, Stephen Pennell, Peter Swett, Huishan Duan, and Michael Woods. Tue . "Laboratory Investigations in Support of Carbon Dioxide-Limestone Sequestration in the Ocean". United States. doi:10.2172/861379. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/861379.
@article{osti_861379,
title = {Laboratory Investigations in Support of Carbon Dioxide-Limestone Sequestration in the Ocean},
author = {Dan Golomb and Eugene Barry and David Ryan and Carl Lawton and Stephen Pennell and Peter Swett and Huishan Duan and Michael Woods},
abstractNote = {This semi-annual progress reports includes further findings on CO{sub 2}-in-Water (C/W) emulsions stabilized by fine particles. In previous semi-annual reports we described the formation of stable C/W emulsions using pulverized limestone (CaCO{sub 3}), flyash, beach sand, shale and lizardite, a rock rich in magnesium silicate. For the creation of these emulsions we used a High-Pressure Batch Reactor (HPBR) equipped with view windows for illumination and video camera recording. For deep ocean sequestration, a C/W emulsion using pulverized limestone may be the most suitable. (a) Limestone (mainly CaCO{sub 3}) is cheap and plentiful; (b) limestone is innocuous for marine organisms (in fact, it is the natural ingredient of shells and corals); (c) it buffers the carbonic acid that forms when CO{sub 2} dissolves in water. For large-scale sequestration of a CO{sub 2}/H{sub 2}O/CaCO{sub 3} emulsion a device is needed that mixes the ingredients, liquid carbon dioxide, seawater, and a slurry of pulverized limestone in seawater continuously, rather than incrementally as in a batch reactor. A practical mixing device is a Kenics-type static mixer. The static mixer has no moving parts, and the shear force for mixing is provided by the hydrostatic pressure of liquid CO{sub 2} and CaCO{sub 3} slurry in the delivery pipes from the shore to the disposal depth. This semi-annual progress report is dedicated to the description of the static mixer and the results that have been obtained using a bench-scale static mixer for the continuous formation of a CO{sub 2}/H{sub 2}O/CaCO{sub 3} emulsion. The static mixer has an ID of 0.63 cm, length 23.5 cm, number of baffles 27. Under pressure, a slurry of CaCO{sub 3} in artificial seawater (3.5% by weight NaCl) and liquid CO{sub 2} are co-injected into the mixer. From the mixer, the resulting emulsion flows into a Jerguson cell with two oblong windows on opposite sides, then it is vented. A fully ported ball valve inserted after the Jerguson cell allows the emulsion to be stopped in the cell. In such a manner the emulsion can be photographed while it is flowing through the cell, or after it has stagnated in the cell. A slurry of 10 g/L CaCO{sub 3} (Sigma Chemicals C-4830 reagent grade) in artificial seawater, co-injected into the static mixer at a rate of 1.5 L/min with liquid CO{sub 2} at a rate of 150 mL/min, at temperature 5-10 C, pressure 10 MPa, produced an emulsion with mean globule diameter in the 70-100 {micro}m range. In a HPBR, using the same materials, proportions, temperature and pressure, mixed with a magnetic stir bar at 1300 rpm, the mean globule diameter is in the 200-300 {micro}m range. Evidently, the static mixer produces an emulsion with smaller globule diameters and narrower distribution of globule diameters than a batch reactor.},
doi = {10.2172/861379},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {Tue Nov 01 00:00:00 EST 2005},
month = {Tue Nov 01 00:00:00 EST 2005}
}

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