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Title: Semiconductor Nanocrystals for Biological Imaging

Abstract

Conventional organic fluorophores suffer from poor photo stability, narrow absorption spectra and broad emission feature. Semiconductor nanocrystals, on the other hand, are highly photo-stable with broad absorption spectra and narrow size-tunable emission spectra. Recent advances in the synthesis of these materials have resulted in bright, sensitive, extremely photo-stable and biocompatible semiconductor fluorophores. Commercial availability facilitates their application in a variety of unprecedented biological experiments, including multiplexed cellular imaging, long-term in vitro and in vivo labeling, deep tissue structure mapping and single particle investigation of dynamic cellular processes. Semiconductor nanocrystals are one of the first examples of nanotechnology enabling a new class of biomedical applications.

Authors:
; ; ;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Ernest Orlando Lawrence Berkeley NationalLaboratory, Berkeley, CA (US)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE; National Institutes of Health. National Center forResearch Resources Agreement 0980GCF709, Department of Defense. BreastCancer Research progam DAMD17-03-1-9637, US Defense Advanced ResearchProject Agency. Air Force Office of Scientific Research. DefenseUniversity Research Initiative on Nanotechnology Program GrantF49620-01-1-0474
OSTI Identifier:
861264
Report Number(s):
LBNL-57928
R&D Project: M50013; BnR: 600305000; TRN: US200601%%754
DOE Contract Number:
DE-AC02-05CH11231; NIH:0980GCD709
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Current Opinion in Neurobiology; Journal Volume: 15; Journal Issue: 5; Related Information: Journal Publication Date: 10/2005
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
36 MATERIALS SCIENCE; 37 INORGANIC, ORGANIC, PHYSICAL AND ANALYTICAL CHEMISTRY; ABSORPTION SPECTRA; AVAILABILITY; EMISSION SPECTRA; IN VITRO; IN VIVO; STABILITY; SYNTHESIS; Semiconductor nanocrystals quantum dots fluorescent probeimaging

Citation Formats

Fu, Aihua, Gu, Weiwei, Larabell, Carolyn, and Alivisatos, A. Paul. Semiconductor Nanocrystals for Biological Imaging. United States: N. p., 2005. Web. doi:10.1016/j.conb.2005.08.004.
Fu, Aihua, Gu, Weiwei, Larabell, Carolyn, & Alivisatos, A. Paul. Semiconductor Nanocrystals for Biological Imaging. United States. doi:10.1016/j.conb.2005.08.004.
Fu, Aihua, Gu, Weiwei, Larabell, Carolyn, and Alivisatos, A. Paul. Tue . "Semiconductor Nanocrystals for Biological Imaging". United States. doi:10.1016/j.conb.2005.08.004. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/861264.
@article{osti_861264,
title = {Semiconductor Nanocrystals for Biological Imaging},
author = {Fu, Aihua and Gu, Weiwei and Larabell, Carolyn and Alivisatos, A. Paul},
abstractNote = {Conventional organic fluorophores suffer from poor photo stability, narrow absorption spectra and broad emission feature. Semiconductor nanocrystals, on the other hand, are highly photo-stable with broad absorption spectra and narrow size-tunable emission spectra. Recent advances in the synthesis of these materials have resulted in bright, sensitive, extremely photo-stable and biocompatible semiconductor fluorophores. Commercial availability facilitates their application in a variety of unprecedented biological experiments, including multiplexed cellular imaging, long-term in vitro and in vivo labeling, deep tissue structure mapping and single particle investigation of dynamic cellular processes. Semiconductor nanocrystals are one of the first examples of nanotechnology enabling a new class of biomedical applications.},
doi = {10.1016/j.conb.2005.08.004},
journal = {Current Opinion in Neurobiology},
number = 5,
volume = 15,
place = {United States},
year = {Tue Jun 28 00:00:00 EDT 2005},
month = {Tue Jun 28 00:00:00 EDT 2005}
}
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