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Title: Phase I DOE SBIR - Final Report; Novel, Redox Stabilized Li-ion Rechargeable Cell

Authors:
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Farasis Energy, Inc - Hayward, CA
Sponsoring Org.:
Department of Energy
OSTI Identifier:
861087
DOE Contract Number:
FG02-04ER83951
Type / Phase:
SBIR
Resource Type:
Technical Report
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
25 ENERGY STORAGE; Li-ion, Battery, Safety

Citation Formats

Kepler, Keith D. Phase I DOE SBIR - Final Report; Novel, Redox Stabilized Li-ion Rechargeable Cell. United States: N. p., 2005. Web.
Kepler, Keith D. Phase I DOE SBIR - Final Report; Novel, Redox Stabilized Li-ion Rechargeable Cell. United States.
Kepler, Keith D. Mon . "Phase I DOE SBIR - Final Report; Novel, Redox Stabilized Li-ion Rechargeable Cell". United States. doi:.
@article{osti_861087,
title = {Phase I DOE SBIR - Final Report; Novel, Redox Stabilized Li-ion Rechargeable Cell},
author = {Kepler, Keith D.},
abstractNote = {},
doi = {},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {Mon Dec 05 00:00:00 EST 2005},
month = {Mon Dec 05 00:00:00 EST 2005}
}

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  • Microtron-based Compact, Portable Gamma-Ray Source. The objective of Phase I of this project was to produce a conceptual design of a prototype compact microtron electron accelerator, which could be designed, built, and demonstrated in Phase II of the project. The conceptual design study included an analysis of the parameters of the microtron and its components, and the expected performance of the prototype microtron as a source of x-rays and/or RF neutrons in the MeV energy range. The major components of the microtron are the magnet, the accelerating system, the power system, the vacuum system, the control system, the beam extractionmore » system and the targets to produce x-rays (and/or neutrons). Our objectives for the design of the prototype were for it to be compact, cost-effective, capable of producing high intensity x-ray (an/or neutron) fluxes. In addition, the prototype was to be easily assembled and disassembled so that components could be easily replaced. The main parameters for the prototype are the following: the range of electron kinetic energies, the output power, the RF frequency band (X-band, C-band, or S-Band), the type of injection (Type I or Type II), the magnet type, i.e. permanent magnet, electromagnet, or a hybrid combination of permanent and electromagnet. The results of the Phase I study and analysis for a prototype microtron are the following: The electron energy range can be varied from below 6 MeV to 9 MeV, the optimal frequency range is S-Band (2-4 GHz) RF frequency, Type II injection (described below), and the magnet type is the hybrid version. The prototype version will be capable of producing gamma ray doses of ~1800 R/min-m and neutron fluxes of up to ~6 x 10 10 n/s with appropriate targets. The results of the Phase I study and analysis are provided below. The proposed Phase II plan was to demonstrate the prototype at low beam power. In the subsequent Phase III, high power tests would be performed, and the design of commercial versions of microtrons with various energies, sizes and types would be produced and marketed, including a more compact and more portable 6 MeV battery-powered model that more closely meets the requirements in the original FOA topic description. In the course of the Phase I study, we also identified another microtron version, one that was larger (not compact) and more powerful than that of the Phase II prototype, which could serve as an intense source of photo- neutrons, up to 4 x 10 12 n/s for use in nuclear medicine, short-lived isotope production, or other applications. In addition, it could produce gamma dose rates up to 130 kR/min-m with a heavy metal bremsstrahlung target. The results and specifications of this were submitted to IPAC16 (Reference [12]) the paper is included in Addendum B. Because this version was beyond the scope of the Phase I project, there is no additional description in the Final Report.« less