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Title: DOE Office of Science Funded Basic Research at NREL that Impacts Photovoltaic Technologies

Abstract

The DOE Office of Science, Basic Energy Sciences, supports a number of basic research projects in materials, chemicals, and biosciences at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) that impact several renewable energy technologies, including photovoltaics (PV). The goal of the Material Sciences projects is to study the structural, optical, electrical, and defect properties of semiconductors and related materials using state-of-the-art experimental and theoretical techniques. Specific projects involving PV include: ordering in III-V semiconductors, isoelectronic co-doping, doping bottlenecks in semiconductors, solid-state theory, and computational science. The goal of the Chemical Sciences projects is to advance the fundamental understanding of the relevant science involving materials, photochemistry, photoelectrochemistry, nanoscale chemistry, and catalysis that support solar photochemical conversion technologies. Specific projects relating to PV include: dye-sensitized TiO2 solar cells, semiconductor nanostructures, and molecular semiconductors. This presentation will give an overview of some of the major accomplishments of these projects.

Authors:
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE
OSTI Identifier:
860940
Report Number(s):
NREL/CP-590-37323
TRN: US200524%%385
DOE Contract Number:
AC36-99-GO10337
Resource Type:
Conference
Resource Relation:
Related Information: Presented at the 2004 DOE Solar Energy Technologies Program Review Meeting, 25-28 October 2004, Denver, Colorado. Also included in the proceedings available on CD-ROM (DOE/GO-102005-2067; NREL/CD-520-37140)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
14 SOLAR ENERGY; 36 MATERIALS SCIENCE; CATALYSIS; CHEMISTRY; DEFECTS; NANOSTRUCTURES; NATIONAL RENEWABLE ENERGY LABORATORY; PHOTOCHEMISTRY; SOLAR CELLS; SOLAR ENERGY; PV; MATERIAL SCIENCES; STRUCTURAL; OPTICAL; ELECTRICAL; DEFECT; III-V SEMICONDUCTORS; NANOSCALE; Basic Sciences; Solar Energy - Photovoltaics

Citation Formats

Deb, S. K. DOE Office of Science Funded Basic Research at NREL that Impacts Photovoltaic Technologies. United States: N. p., 2005. Web.
Deb, S. K. DOE Office of Science Funded Basic Research at NREL that Impacts Photovoltaic Technologies. United States.
Deb, S. K. Sat . "DOE Office of Science Funded Basic Research at NREL that Impacts Photovoltaic Technologies". United States. doi:. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/860940.
@article{osti_860940,
title = {DOE Office of Science Funded Basic Research at NREL that Impacts Photovoltaic Technologies},
author = {Deb, S. K.},
abstractNote = {The DOE Office of Science, Basic Energy Sciences, supports a number of basic research projects in materials, chemicals, and biosciences at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) that impact several renewable energy technologies, including photovoltaics (PV). The goal of the Material Sciences projects is to study the structural, optical, electrical, and defect properties of semiconductors and related materials using state-of-the-art experimental and theoretical techniques. Specific projects involving PV include: ordering in III-V semiconductors, isoelectronic co-doping, doping bottlenecks in semiconductors, solid-state theory, and computational science. The goal of the Chemical Sciences projects is to advance the fundamental understanding of the relevant science involving materials, photochemistry, photoelectrochemistry, nanoscale chemistry, and catalysis that support solar photochemical conversion technologies. Specific projects relating to PV include: dye-sensitized TiO2 solar cells, semiconductor nanostructures, and molecular semiconductors. This presentation will give an overview of some of the major accomplishments of these projects.},
doi = {},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {Sat Jan 01 00:00:00 EST 2005},
month = {Sat Jan 01 00:00:00 EST 2005}
}

Conference:
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