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Title: Cost Analysis of Environmental Control Systems applicable to Geothermal Energy Development

Abstract

This report provides an engineering performance and cost correlations from which user could estimate costs of mitigating principal emissions from geothermal power systems. Hydrogen sulfide abatement describes four processes; Iron catalyst, Stretford, EIC, and Dow oxygenation process. Wastewater treatments include: Chemical precipitation, Evaporation ponds, Injection without pretreatment, and Injection with pretreatment. Process and cost estimates are given for Best Case, Most Probable Case, and Worst Case 50 MWe power plant. The cases may be confusing since the worst case has the lowest resource temperature, but the highest loads to mitigate. (DJE 2005)

Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Engineering and Economics Research, Inc., Vienna, VA
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE
OSTI Identifier:
860615
Report Number(s):
TR-13-82
DOE Contract Number:
DE-AC-01-81RA-50415
Resource Type:
Technical Report
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
Geothermal Legacy

Citation Formats

None. Cost Analysis of Environmental Control Systems applicable to Geothermal Energy Development. United States: N. p., 1982. Web. doi:10.2172/860615.
None. Cost Analysis of Environmental Control Systems applicable to Geothermal Energy Development. United States. doi:10.2172/860615.
None. Sun . "Cost Analysis of Environmental Control Systems applicable to Geothermal Energy Development". United States. doi:10.2172/860615. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/860615.
@article{osti_860615,
title = {Cost Analysis of Environmental Control Systems applicable to Geothermal Energy Development},
author = {None},
abstractNote = {This report provides an engineering performance and cost correlations from which user could estimate costs of mitigating principal emissions from geothermal power systems. Hydrogen sulfide abatement describes four processes; Iron catalyst, Stretford, EIC, and Dow oxygenation process. Wastewater treatments include: Chemical precipitation, Evaporation ponds, Injection without pretreatment, and Injection with pretreatment. Process and cost estimates are given for Best Case, Most Probable Case, and Worst Case 50 MWe power plant. The cases may be confusing since the worst case has the lowest resource temperature, but the highest loads to mitigate. (DJE 2005)},
doi = {10.2172/860615},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {Sun Aug 01 00:00:00 EDT 1982},
month = {Sun Aug 01 00:00:00 EDT 1982}
}

Technical Report:

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  • The Geothermal Resources Interactive Temporal Simulation (GRITS) model is a computer code designed to estimate the costs of geothermal energy systems. The interactive program allows the user to vary resource, demand, and financial parameters to observe their effects on delivered costs of direct-use geothermal energy. Due to the large number and interdependent nature of the variables that influence these costs, the variables can be handled practically only through computer modeling. This report documents a sensitivity analysis of the cost of direct-use geothermal energy where each major element is varied to measure the responsiveness of cost to changes in that element.more » It is hoped that this analysis will assist those persons interested in geothermal energy to understand the most significant cost element as well as those individuals interested in using the GRITS program in the future.« less
  • Results of a study on the evaluation of potential for geothermal energy development and utilization in California are reported. This is Volume II of the two-volume report. The first four chapters of this volume present a generic analysis of several decisions facing government in the field of hydrothermal energy. The analysis develops a framework for estimating the potential overall benefits of hydrothermal power (detailed in Appendix A). Chapter V contains a site-specific analysis of the decision to fund a demonstration plant at Heber, California. This analysis is performed from the point of view of both the government and the local-electricitymore » consumer. The specific numerical results presented are limited to electrical power generated by hot water systems. (JGB)« less
  • Selective catalytic reduction (SCR) is a process for the post-combustion removal of NO{sub x} from the flue gas of fossil-fuel-fired power plants. SCR is capable of NO{sub x} reduction efficiencies of up to 80 or 90 percent. SCR technology has been applied for treatment of flue gases from a variety of emission sources, including natural gas- and oil-fired gas turbines, process steam boilers in refineries, and coal-fired power plants. SCR applications to coal-fired power plants have occurred in Japan and Germany. Full-scale SCR systems have not been applied to coal-fired power plants in the U.S., although there have been small-scalemore » demonstration projects. Increasingly strict NO{sub x} control requirements are being imposed by various state and local regulatory agencies in the U.S. These requirements may lead to U.S. SCR applications, particularly for plants burning low sulfur coals (Robie et al.). Furthermore, implicit in Title IV of the 1990 Clean Air Act Amendment is a national NO{sub x} emission reduction of 2 million tons per year. Thus, there may be other incentives to adapt SCR technology more generally to U.S. coal-fired power plants with varying coal sulfur contents. However, concern remains over the applicability of SCR technology to U.S. plants burning high sulfur coals or coals with significantly different fly ash characteristics than those burned in Germany and Japan. There is also concern regarding the application of SCR to peaking units due to potential startup and shutdown problems (Lowe et al.). In this report, new capital cost models of two SCR systems are developed. These are {open_quotes}hot-side high-dust{close_quotes} and {open_quotes}tail-end low-dust{close_quotes} options. In a previous quarterly report, performance models for these two systems were developed.« less
  • This report was prepared to support development of the Department of Energy Environmental Management cost infrastructure -- a new capability to independently estimate and analyze costs. Currently, the cost data are reported according to a structure that blends level of effort tasks with product and process oriented tasks. Also. the budgetary inputs are developed from prior year funding authorizations and from contractor-developed parametric estimates that have been adjusted to planned funding levels or appropriations. Consequently, it is difficult for headquarters and field-level activities to use actual cost data and technical requirements to independently assess the costs generated and identify trends,more » potential cost savings from process improvements, and cost reduction strategies.« less
  • The Geothermal Energy Systems Environmental Development Plan (EDP) identifies the environmental, health, safety, social, and economic issues which are associated with the development, demonstration, and commercialization of geothermal resources and conversion technology. The EDP also describes the actions and implementation strategy required to resolve the issues identified. These actions may include the initiation of R and D activities, operations monitoring, baseline characterization studies, or activities leading to the development of standards and criteria in concert with other responsible agencies.