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Title: An Initial Assessment of Hanford Impact Performed with the System Assessment Capability

Abstract

The System Assessment Capability is an integrated system of computer models and databases to assess the impact of waste remaining at Hanford. This tool will help decision makers and the public evaluate the cumulative effects of contamination from Hanford. This report describes the results of an initial assessment performed with the System Assessment Capability tools.

Authors:
; ; ;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE
OSTI Identifier:
860131
Report Number(s):
PNNL-14027
820201000; TRN: US0504828
DOE Contract Number:
AC05-76RL01830
Resource Type:
Technical Report
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
11 NUCLEAR FUEL CYCLE AND FUEL MATERIALS; 54 ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES; 99 GENERAL AND MISCELLANEOUS//MATHEMATICS, COMPUTING, AND INFORMATION SCIENCE; HANFORD RESERVATION; S CODES; RADIOACTIVE WASTE MANAGEMENT; INFORMATION SYSTEMS; ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACTS; EVALUATION; contamination; groundwater; vadose zone; risk; dose; computer model; conceptual model; numerical model'

Citation Formats

Bryce, Robert W., Kincaid, Charles T., Eslinger, Paul W., and Morasch, Launa F. An Initial Assessment of Hanford Impact Performed with the System Assessment Capability. United States: N. p., 2002. Web. doi:10.2172/860131.
Bryce, Robert W., Kincaid, Charles T., Eslinger, Paul W., & Morasch, Launa F. An Initial Assessment of Hanford Impact Performed with the System Assessment Capability. United States. doi:10.2172/860131.
Bryce, Robert W., Kincaid, Charles T., Eslinger, Paul W., and Morasch, Launa F. 2002. "An Initial Assessment of Hanford Impact Performed with the System Assessment Capability". United States. doi:10.2172/860131. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/860131.
@article{osti_860131,
title = {An Initial Assessment of Hanford Impact Performed with the System Assessment Capability},
author = {Bryce, Robert W. and Kincaid, Charles T. and Eslinger, Paul W. and Morasch, Launa F.},
abstractNote = {The System Assessment Capability is an integrated system of computer models and databases to assess the impact of waste remaining at Hanford. This tool will help decision makers and the public evaluate the cumulative effects of contamination from Hanford. This report describes the results of an initial assessment performed with the System Assessment Capability tools.},
doi = {10.2172/860131},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = 2002,
month = 9
}

Technical Report:

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  • The System Assessment Capability (SAC) is a suite of interrelated computer codes that provides the capability to conduct large-scale environmental assessments on the Hanford Site. Developed by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory for the Department of Energy, SAC models the fate and transport of radioactive and chemical contaminants, starting with the inventory of those contaminants in waste sites, simulating transport through the environment, and continuing on through impacts to the environment and humans. Separate modules in the SAC address inventory, release from waste forms, water flow and mass transport in the vadose zone, water flow and mass transport in the groundwater,more » water flow and mass transport in the Columbia River, air transport, and human and ecological impacts. The SAC supports deterministic analyses as well as stochastic analyses using a Monte Carlo approach, enabling SAC users to examine the effect of uncertainties in a number of key parameters. The initial assessment performed with the SAC software identified a number of areas where both the software and the analysis approach could be improved. Since that time the following six major software upgrades have been made: (1) An air pathway model was added to support all-pathway analyses. (2) Models for releases from glass waste forms, buried graphite reactor cores, and buried naval reactor compartments were added. (3) An air-water dual-phase model was added to more accurately track the movement of volatile contaminants in the vadose zone. (4) The ability to run analyses was extended from 1,000 years to 10,000 years or longer after site closure. (5) The vadose zone flow and transport model was upgraded to support two-dimensional or three-dimensional analyses. (6) The ecological model and human risk models were upgraded so the concentrations of contaminants in food products consumed by humans are produced by the ecological model. This report documents the functions in the SAC software and provides a number of example applications for Hanford problems. References to theory documents and user guides are provided as well as links to a number of published data sets that support running analyses of interest to Hanford cleanup efforts.« less
  • A waste retrieval system has been defined to provide a safe and cost-effective solution to the Hanford Tanks Initiative. This system consists of the EMMA robotic manipulator (by GreyPilgrim LLC) and the lightweight Scarifier (by Waterjet Technology, Inc.) powered by a 36-kpsi Jet-Edge diesel powered high pressure pumping system. For demonstration and testing purposes, an air conveyance system was utilized to remove the waste from the simulated tank floor. The EMMA long reach manipulator utilized for this demonstration was 33 feet long. It consisted of 4 hydraulically controlled stages of varying lengths and coupling configurations. T
  • In order to better review licensing submittals for a High-Level Waste Repository, the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission staff has expanded and improved its capability to conduct performance assessments. This report documents an initial demonstration of this capability. The demonstration made use of the limited data from Yucca Mountain, Nevada to investigate a small set of scenario classes. Models of release and transport of radionuclides from a repository via the groundwater and direct release pathways provided preliminary estimates of releases to the accessible environment for a 10,000 year simulation time. Latin hypercube sampling of input parameters was used to express resultsmore » as distributions and to investigate model sensitivities. This methodology demonstration should not be interpreted as an estimate of performance of the proposed repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada. By expanding and developing the NRC staff capability to conduct such analyses, NRC would be better able to conduct an independent technical review of the US Department of Energy (DOE) licensing submittals for a high-level waste (HLW) repository. These activities were divided initially into Phase 1 and Phase 2 activities. Additional phases may follow as part of a program of iterative performance assessment at the NRC. The NRC staff conducted Phase 1 activities primarily in CY 1989 with minimal participation from NRC contractors. The Phase 2 activities were to involve NRC contractors actively and to provide for the transfer of technology. The Phase 2 activities are scheduled to start in CY 1990, to allow Sandia National Laboratories to complete development and transfer of computer codes and the Center for Nuclear Waste Regulatory Analyses (CNWRA) to be in a position to assist in the acquisition of the codes.« less
  • Additional information is presented on the methods used in the Core Protection Calculators (CPC) to process sensor information and initiate a Low DNBR trip. A detailed examination of the uncertainties associated with the synthesis of the ''static'' DNBR and the ability with which the CPC's accommodate CEA misalignments are presented. The overpower margin uncertainty assigned to the CPC synthesized DNBR is given in each of nine regions of core operating space. The uncertainty in the region of normal operation is 2.6 percent at the 95/95 confidence level. (auth)