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Title: Physical, Chemical and Structural Evolution of Zeolite-Containing Waste Forms Produced from Metakaolinite and Calcined Sodium Bearing Waste (HLW and/or LLW)

Abstract

Zeolites are extremely versatile. They can adsorb liquids and gases and serve as cation exchange media. They occur in nature as well cemented deposits. The ancient Romans used blocks of zeolitized tuff as a building material. Using zeolites for the management of radioactive waste is not a new idea, but a process by which the zeolites can be made to act as a cementing agent is. Zeolitic materials are relatively easy to synthesize from a wide range of both natural and man-made substances. The process under study is derived from a well known method in which metakaolin (an impure thermally dehydroxylated kaolinite heated to {approx}700 C containing traces of quartz and mica) is mixed with sodium hydroxide (NaOH) and reacted in slurry form (for a day or two) at mildly elevated temperatures. The zeolites form as finely divided powders containing micrometer ({micro}m) sized crystals. However, if the process is changed slightly and only just enough concentrated sodium hydroxide solution is added to the metakaolinite to make a thick crumbly paste and then the paste is compacted and cured under mild hydrothermal conditions (60-200 C), the mixture will form a hard ceramic-like material containing distinct crystalline tectosilicate minerals (zeolites and feldspathoids)more » imbedded in an X-ray amorphous hydrated sodium aluminosilicate matrix. Due to its lack of porosity and vitreous appearance we have chosen to call this composite a ''hydroceramic''.« less

Authors:
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
The Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA 16802 (US)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Environmental Management (EM); USDOE Office of Science (SC) (US)
OSTI Identifier:
841087
Report Number(s):
DOE/ER/45726-FINAL
TRN: US0502413
DOE Contract Number:  
FG07-98ER45726
Resource Type:
Technical Report
Resource Relation:
Other Information: PBD: 27 Jun 2005
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
12 MANAGEMENT OF RADIOACTIVE WASTES, AND NON-RADIOACTIVE WASTES FROM NUCLEAR FACILITIES; 36 MATERIALS SCIENCE; 42 ENGINEERING; 54 ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES; BUILDING MATERIALS; CATIONS; CEMENTING; GASES; KAOLINITE; MICA; MIXTURES; POROSITY; QUARTZ; RADIOACTIVE WASTES; SODIUM; SODIUM HYDROXIDES; TUFF; WASTE FORMS; WASTES; ZEOLITES; WASTE FORMS, HYDROCERAMIC, METAKAOLIN, GEOPOLYMER, ZEOLITES, SODIUM BEARING WASTE, SBW

Citation Formats

Grutzeck, Michael W. Physical, Chemical and Structural Evolution of Zeolite-Containing Waste Forms Produced from Metakaolinite and Calcined Sodium Bearing Waste (HLW and/or LLW). United States: N. p., 2005. Web. doi:10.2172/841087.
Grutzeck, Michael W. Physical, Chemical and Structural Evolution of Zeolite-Containing Waste Forms Produced from Metakaolinite and Calcined Sodium Bearing Waste (HLW and/or LLW). United States. doi:10.2172/841087.
Grutzeck, Michael W. Mon . "Physical, Chemical and Structural Evolution of Zeolite-Containing Waste Forms Produced from Metakaolinite and Calcined Sodium Bearing Waste (HLW and/or LLW)". United States. doi:10.2172/841087. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/841087.
@article{osti_841087,
title = {Physical, Chemical and Structural Evolution of Zeolite-Containing Waste Forms Produced from Metakaolinite and Calcined Sodium Bearing Waste (HLW and/or LLW)},
author = {Grutzeck, Michael W.},
abstractNote = {Zeolites are extremely versatile. They can adsorb liquids and gases and serve as cation exchange media. They occur in nature as well cemented deposits. The ancient Romans used blocks of zeolitized tuff as a building material. Using zeolites for the management of radioactive waste is not a new idea, but a process by which the zeolites can be made to act as a cementing agent is. Zeolitic materials are relatively easy to synthesize from a wide range of both natural and man-made substances. The process under study is derived from a well known method in which metakaolin (an impure thermally dehydroxylated kaolinite heated to {approx}700 C containing traces of quartz and mica) is mixed with sodium hydroxide (NaOH) and reacted in slurry form (for a day or two) at mildly elevated temperatures. The zeolites form as finely divided powders containing micrometer ({micro}m) sized crystals. However, if the process is changed slightly and only just enough concentrated sodium hydroxide solution is added to the metakaolinite to make a thick crumbly paste and then the paste is compacted and cured under mild hydrothermal conditions (60-200 C), the mixture will form a hard ceramic-like material containing distinct crystalline tectosilicate minerals (zeolites and feldspathoids) imbedded in an X-ray amorphous hydrated sodium aluminosilicate matrix. Due to its lack of porosity and vitreous appearance we have chosen to call this composite a ''hydroceramic''.},
doi = {10.2172/841087},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {2005},
month = {6}
}