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Title: Quantifying the Thermal Behavior of Slags (TRP 9903)

Abstract

Successful operation of a continuous caster is based upon control of heat transfer in the mold. The mold slag is a key component in the success of continuous casting; however, the phenomena that occur in the gap between the shell and the mold are largely unknown as until recently there have been no techniques that allowed visualization and quantification of the solidification behavior of liquid slags. This has lead to slag design being an empirical science or art. Recently a new experimental technique, called Double Hot Thermocouple Technique (DHTT), was developed at Carnegie Mellon University that allowed the solidification behavior of a slag to be observed and quantified under conditions that simulate the thermal conditions that occur in steelmaking environments. This technique allows ladle, tundish and mold slags to be characterized under extreme conditions including those found between the mold wall and the growing shell of a continuous caster. Thus, a program is initiated, under this grant, to quantify and describe the phenomena that occur during the solidification of a slag in a steel mill environment. This will allow slag design to become an engineering science rather than an empirical exercise. The project deliverables were as follows: (1) The furthermore » development of a tool that will have broad use in the quantification of slag melting and solidification behavior; and (2) The development of a set of meaningful design criteria for slag application in steel mill environments. The project was broken down into a number of objectives: (a) Develop a systematic understanding of the effect of cooling rate on slag solidification; (b) Develop a systematic understanding on the effect of slag chemistry changes on slag solidification behavior; (c) Develop a method to characterize slag melting; (d) Develop an understanding of the role of the environment on slag solidification and melting; (e) Develop the ability to understand slag solidification under the conditions that occur in a continuous caster; (f) Develop an ability to predict the solidification behavior of slags; and (g) Develop the criteria for optimization of slags in steelmaking environments where they are under thermal gradients.« less

Authors:
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
American Iron and Steel Institute (US)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Industrial Technologies (OIT) (EE-20) (US)
OSTI Identifier:
840954
DOE Contract Number:  
FC36-97ID13554
Resource Type:
Technical Report
Resource Relation:
Other Information: PBD: 30 May 2003
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
36 MATERIALS SCIENCE; 32 ENERGY CONSERVATION, CONSUMPTION, AND UTILIZATION; CASTING; CHEMISTRY; DESIGN; HEAT TRANSFER; MELTING; OPTIMIZATION; SLAGS; SOLIDIFICATION; STEELS; TEMPERATURE GRADIENTS; THERMOCOUPLES

Citation Formats

Alan W. Cramb. Quantifying the Thermal Behavior of Slags (TRP 9903). United States: N. p., 2003. Web. doi:10.2172/840954.
Alan W. Cramb. Quantifying the Thermal Behavior of Slags (TRP 9903). United States. doi:10.2172/840954.
Alan W. Cramb. Fri . "Quantifying the Thermal Behavior of Slags (TRP 9903)". United States. doi:10.2172/840954. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/840954.
@article{osti_840954,
title = {Quantifying the Thermal Behavior of Slags (TRP 9903)},
author = {Alan W. Cramb},
abstractNote = {Successful operation of a continuous caster is based upon control of heat transfer in the mold. The mold slag is a key component in the success of continuous casting; however, the phenomena that occur in the gap between the shell and the mold are largely unknown as until recently there have been no techniques that allowed visualization and quantification of the solidification behavior of liquid slags. This has lead to slag design being an empirical science or art. Recently a new experimental technique, called Double Hot Thermocouple Technique (DHTT), was developed at Carnegie Mellon University that allowed the solidification behavior of a slag to be observed and quantified under conditions that simulate the thermal conditions that occur in steelmaking environments. This technique allows ladle, tundish and mold slags to be characterized under extreme conditions including those found between the mold wall and the growing shell of a continuous caster. Thus, a program is initiated, under this grant, to quantify and describe the phenomena that occur during the solidification of a slag in a steel mill environment. This will allow slag design to become an engineering science rather than an empirical exercise. The project deliverables were as follows: (1) The further development of a tool that will have broad use in the quantification of slag melting and solidification behavior; and (2) The development of a set of meaningful design criteria for slag application in steel mill environments. The project was broken down into a number of objectives: (a) Develop a systematic understanding of the effect of cooling rate on slag solidification; (b) Develop a systematic understanding on the effect of slag chemistry changes on slag solidification behavior; (c) Develop a method to characterize slag melting; (d) Develop an understanding of the role of the environment on slag solidification and melting; (e) Develop the ability to understand slag solidification under the conditions that occur in a continuous caster; (f) Develop an ability to predict the solidification behavior of slags; and (g) Develop the criteria for optimization of slags in steelmaking environments where they are under thermal gradients.},
doi = {10.2172/840954},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {Fri May 30 00:00:00 EDT 2003},
month = {Fri May 30 00:00:00 EDT 2003}
}

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