skip to main content
OSTI.GOV title logo U.S. Department of Energy
Office of Scientific and Technical Information

Title: Development of Appropriate Spot Welding Practice for Advanced High Strength Steels (TRP 0114)

Abstract

This program evaluated the effects of common manufacturing variables on spike-tempering effectiveness. The investigation used design-of-experiment (DOE) techniques, and examined both dual-phase and martensitic grades of high-strength steels (HSS). The specific grades chosen for this project were: Dual-phase (DP) 600, galvannealed (GA), 1.55 mm (DP) 600; Dual-phase (DP) 980 (uncoated), 1.55 mm (DP) 980; and Martensitic (M) 1300, 1.55 mm (M) 1300. Common manufacturing conditions of interest included tempering practice (quench and temper time), button size, simulated part fitup (sheet angular misalignment and fitup), and electrode wear (increased electrode face diameter). All of these conditions were evaluated against mechanical performance (static and dynamic tensile shear). Weld hardness data was also used to examine correlations between mechanical performance and the degree of tempering. Mechanical performance data was used to develop empirical models. The models were used to examine the robustness of weld strength and toughness to the selected processing conditions. This was done using standard EWI techniques. Graphical representations of robustness were then coupled with metallographic data to relate mechanical properties to the effectiveness of spike tempering. Mechanical properties for all three materials were relatively robust to variation in tempering. Major deviations in mechanical properties were caused by degradation of themore » weld itself. This was supported by a lack of correlation between hardness data and mechanical results. Small button sizes and large electrode face diameters (worn electrodes) produced large reductions in both static and dynamic strength levels when compared to standard production setups. Dynamic strength was further degraded by edge-located welds.« less

Authors:
; ;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
American Iron and Steel Institute (US)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Industrial Technologies (OIT) (EE-20) (US)
OSTI Identifier:
840947
DOE Contract Number:  
FC36-97ID13554
Resource Type:
Technical Report
Resource Relation:
Other Information: PBD: 17 Sep 2004
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
32 ENERGY CONSERVATION, CONSUMPTION, AND UTILIZATION; 36 MATERIALS SCIENCE; ELECTRODES; HARDNESS; MANUFACTURING; MECHANICAL PROPERTIES; PERFORMANCE; PROCESSING; PRODUCTION; SHEAR; STEELS; TEMPERING; WELDING

Citation Formats

Girvin, Brian, Peterson, Warren, and Gould, Jerry. Development of Appropriate Spot Welding Practice for Advanced High Strength Steels (TRP 0114). United States: N. p., 2004. Web. doi:10.2172/840947.
Girvin, Brian, Peterson, Warren, & Gould, Jerry. Development of Appropriate Spot Welding Practice for Advanced High Strength Steels (TRP 0114). United States. doi:10.2172/840947.
Girvin, Brian, Peterson, Warren, and Gould, Jerry. Fri . "Development of Appropriate Spot Welding Practice for Advanced High Strength Steels (TRP 0114)". United States. doi:10.2172/840947. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/840947.
@article{osti_840947,
title = {Development of Appropriate Spot Welding Practice for Advanced High Strength Steels (TRP 0114)},
author = {Girvin, Brian and Peterson, Warren and Gould, Jerry},
abstractNote = {This program evaluated the effects of common manufacturing variables on spike-tempering effectiveness. The investigation used design-of-experiment (DOE) techniques, and examined both dual-phase and martensitic grades of high-strength steels (HSS). The specific grades chosen for this project were: Dual-phase (DP) 600, galvannealed (GA), 1.55 mm (DP) 600; Dual-phase (DP) 980 (uncoated), 1.55 mm (DP) 980; and Martensitic (M) 1300, 1.55 mm (M) 1300. Common manufacturing conditions of interest included tempering practice (quench and temper time), button size, simulated part fitup (sheet angular misalignment and fitup), and electrode wear (increased electrode face diameter). All of these conditions were evaluated against mechanical performance (static and dynamic tensile shear). Weld hardness data was also used to examine correlations between mechanical performance and the degree of tempering. Mechanical performance data was used to develop empirical models. The models were used to examine the robustness of weld strength and toughness to the selected processing conditions. This was done using standard EWI techniques. Graphical representations of robustness were then coupled with metallographic data to relate mechanical properties to the effectiveness of spike tempering. Mechanical properties for all three materials were relatively robust to variation in tempering. Major deviations in mechanical properties were caused by degradation of the weld itself. This was supported by a lack of correlation between hardness data and mechanical results. Small button sizes and large electrode face diameters (worn electrodes) produced large reductions in both static and dynamic strength levels when compared to standard production setups. Dynamic strength was further degraded by edge-located welds.},
doi = {10.2172/840947},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {2004},
month = {9}
}