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Title: Spatially Interpolated Nonlinear Anodization in Synthetic Aperture Radar Imagery

Abstract

Spatially Interpolated Nonlinear Anodization in Synthetic Aperture Original formulation of spatially variant anodization for complex synthetic aperture radar (SAR) imagery oversampled at twice the Nyquist rate (2.OX). Here we report a spatially interpolating, noninteger-oversampled SVA sidelobe. The pixel's apparent IPR location is assessed by comparing its value to the sum of its value plus weighted comparable for exact interpolation. However, exact interpolation implies an ideal sine interpolator3 and large components may not be necessary. Note that P is the summation of IPR diagonal values. The value of a sine IPR on the diagonals is a sine-squared; values much less than cardinal direction (m, n) values. This implies that cardinal direction interpolation requires higher precision than diagonal interpolation. Consequently, we employed a smaller set. The spatially interpolated SVA used an 8-point/4-point sine interpolator described above. Table 1 shows the Table 1 results show a two-times speed-up using the 1.3x oversampled and spatially interpolated SVA over the Figure 1d. Detected results of 1.3x oversampled sine interpolated spatially variant

Authors:
; ;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (US); Sandia National Labs., Livermore, CA (US)
Sponsoring Org.:
US Department of Energy (US)
OSTI Identifier:
8407
Report Number(s):
SAND99-1629J
TRN: AH200117%%84
DOE Contract Number:
AC04-94AL85000
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Optics Letters; Other Information: Submitted to Optics Letters; PBD: 29 Jun 1999
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
47 OTHER INSTRUMENTATION; ANODIZATION; APERTURES; INTERPOLATION; RADAR; IMAGE PROCESSING

Citation Formats

Eichel, Paul H., Jakowatz, Jr., Charles V., and Yocky, David A. Spatially Interpolated Nonlinear Anodization in Synthetic Aperture Radar Imagery. United States: N. p., 1999. Web.
Eichel, Paul H., Jakowatz, Jr., Charles V., & Yocky, David A. Spatially Interpolated Nonlinear Anodization in Synthetic Aperture Radar Imagery. United States.
Eichel, Paul H., Jakowatz, Jr., Charles V., and Yocky, David A. Tue . "Spatially Interpolated Nonlinear Anodization in Synthetic Aperture Radar Imagery". United States. doi:. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/8407.
@article{osti_8407,
title = {Spatially Interpolated Nonlinear Anodization in Synthetic Aperture Radar Imagery},
author = {Eichel, Paul H. and Jakowatz, Jr., Charles V. and Yocky, David A.},
abstractNote = {Spatially Interpolated Nonlinear Anodization in Synthetic Aperture Original formulation of spatially variant anodization for complex synthetic aperture radar (SAR) imagery oversampled at twice the Nyquist rate (2.OX). Here we report a spatially interpolating, noninteger-oversampled SVA sidelobe. The pixel's apparent IPR location is assessed by comparing its value to the sum of its value plus weighted comparable for exact interpolation. However, exact interpolation implies an ideal sine interpolator3 and large components may not be necessary. Note that P is the summation of IPR diagonal values. The value of a sine IPR on the diagonals is a sine-squared; values much less than cardinal direction (m, n) values. This implies that cardinal direction interpolation requires higher precision than diagonal interpolation. Consequently, we employed a smaller set. The spatially interpolated SVA used an 8-point/4-point sine interpolator described above. Table 1 shows the Table 1 results show a two-times speed-up using the 1.3x oversampled and spatially interpolated SVA over the Figure 1d. Detected results of 1.3x oversampled sine interpolated spatially variant},
doi = {},
journal = {Optics Letters},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {Tue Jun 29 00:00:00 EDT 1999},
month = {Tue Jun 29 00:00:00 EDT 1999}
}
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