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Title: OCRWM Science and Technology Program Cementitious Materials Technologies

Abstract

This potential project will develop and test cost effective cementitious materials for construction of Yucca Mountain (YM) inverts, drift liners, and bulkheads. These high silica cementitious materials will be designed to buffer the pH and Eh of the groundwater, to slow corrosion of waste packages (WP), and to retard radionuclide migration. While being compatible with YM repository systems, these materials are expected to be less expensive to produce, and as strong, and more durable than ordinary Portland Cement (OPC). Therefore, building out the repository with these cementitious materials may significantly reduce these costs and reduce uncertainty in short-(<2,000 yr) and long-term (> 10,000 yr) repository performance. Both laboratory development and natural analog studies are anticipated using a unique combination of expertise at ORNL, UT, UC Berkeley, and Minatom to develop and test high-silica hydraulic, cementitious binders for use at YM. The major tasks of this project are to (1) formulate and make candidate cementitious materials using high-silica hydraulic hinders, (2) measure the physical and chemical properties of these materials, (3) expose combinations of these materials and WP materials to static and flowing YM groundwater at temperatures consistent with the expected repository conditions, (4) examine specimens of both the cementitious materialsmore » and WP materials periodically for chemical and mineralogical changes to determine reaction mechanisms and kinetics, and (5) predict the long-term performance of the material by thermodynamic and transport modeling and by comparisons with natural analogs.« less

Authors:
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Yucca Mountain Project, Las Vegas, Nevada (US)
Sponsoring Org.:
US Department of Energy (US)
OSTI Identifier:
840127
Resource Type:
Technical Report
Resource Relation:
Other Information: PBD: 1 Oct 2004
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
12 MANAGEMENT OF RADIOACTIVE WASTES, AND NON-RADIOACTIVE WASTES FROM NUCLEAR FACILITIES; BINDERS; BUFFERS; CHEMICAL PROPERTIES; CORROSION; HYDRAULICS; KINETICS; LINERS; PORTLAND CEMENT; RADIONUCLIDE MIGRATION; REACTION KINETICS; SILICA; SIMULATION; THERMODYNAMICS; TRANSPORT; WASTES; YUCCA MOUNTAIN

Citation Formats

DOE,. OCRWM Science and Technology Program Cementitious Materials Technologies. United States: N. p., 2004. Web. doi:10.2172/840127.
DOE,. OCRWM Science and Technology Program Cementitious Materials Technologies. United States. doi:10.2172/840127.
DOE,. Fri . "OCRWM Science and Technology Program Cementitious Materials Technologies". United States. doi:10.2172/840127. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/840127.
@article{osti_840127,
title = {OCRWM Science and Technology Program Cementitious Materials Technologies},
author = {DOE,},
abstractNote = {This potential project will develop and test cost effective cementitious materials for construction of Yucca Mountain (YM) inverts, drift liners, and bulkheads. These high silica cementitious materials will be designed to buffer the pH and Eh of the groundwater, to slow corrosion of waste packages (WP), and to retard radionuclide migration. While being compatible with YM repository systems, these materials are expected to be less expensive to produce, and as strong, and more durable than ordinary Portland Cement (OPC). Therefore, building out the repository with these cementitious materials may significantly reduce these costs and reduce uncertainty in short-(<2,000 yr) and long-term (> 10,000 yr) repository performance. Both laboratory development and natural analog studies are anticipated using a unique combination of expertise at ORNL, UT, UC Berkeley, and Minatom to develop and test high-silica hydraulic, cementitious binders for use at YM. The major tasks of this project are to (1) formulate and make candidate cementitious materials using high-silica hydraulic hinders, (2) measure the physical and chemical properties of these materials, (3) expose combinations of these materials and WP materials to static and flowing YM groundwater at temperatures consistent with the expected repository conditions, (4) examine specimens of both the cementitious materials and WP materials periodically for chemical and mineralogical changes to determine reaction mechanisms and kinetics, and (5) predict the long-term performance of the material by thermodynamic and transport modeling and by comparisons with natural analogs.},
doi = {10.2172/840127},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {2004},
month = {10}
}