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Title: Scientific issues in future induction linac accelerators for heavy ion fusion

Abstract

Achievement of atomic-resolution electron-beam tomography will allow determination of the three-dimensional structure of nanoparticles (and other suitable specimens) at atomic resolution. Three-dimensional reconstructions will yield ''section'' images that resolve atoms overlapped in normal electron microscope images (projections), resolving lighter atoms such as oxygen in the presence of heavier atoms, and atoms that lie on non-lattice sites such as those in non-periodic defect structures. Our first demonstrations of 3-D reconstruction to atomic resolution used five zone-axis images from test specimens of staurolite consisting of a mix of light and heavy atoms. We propose combining ultra-high (sub-Angstrom) resolution zone-axis images with off-zone images by first using linear reconstruction of the off-zone images while excluding images obtained within a small range of tilts (of the order of 60 milliradian) of any zone-axis orientation, since it has been shown that dynamical effects can be mitigated by slight off-axis tilt of the specimen. The (partial) reconstruction would then be used as a model for forward calculation by image simulation in zone-axis directions and the structure refined iteratively to achieve satisfactory fits with the experimental zone-axis data. Another path to atomic-resolution tomography would combine ''zone-axis tomography'' with high-resolution dark-field hollow-cone (DFHC) imaging. Electron diffraction theory indicatesmore » that dynamic (multiple) scattering is much reduced under highly-convergent illumination. DFHC TEM is the analog of HAADF STEM, and imaging theory shows that image resolution can be enhanced under these conditions. Images obtained in this mode could provide the initial reconstruction, with zone-axis images used for refinement.« less

Authors:
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Director. Office of Science. Office of Fusion Energy Sciences, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Contract W-7405-ENG-48, Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory Contract DE-AC02-76CH03073 (US)
OSTI Identifier:
840029
Report Number(s):
LBNL-54472; HIFAN-1292
R&D Project: Z46010; TRN: US0501808
DOE Contract Number:  
AC03-76SF00098
Resource Type:
Conference
Resource Relation:
Conference: 15th International Symposium on Heavy Ion Inertial Fusion, Princeton, NJ (US), 06/07/2004--06/11/2004; Other Information: PBD: 7 Jun 2004
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
43 PARTICLE ACCELERATORS; 32 ENERGY CONSERVATION, CONSUMPTION, AND UTILIZATION; ACCELERATORS; ATOMS; DEFECTS; ELECTRON DIFFRACTION; ELECTRON MICROSCOPES; HEAVY IONS; ILLUMINANCE; INDUCTION; LINEAR ACCELERATORS; ORIENTATION; OXYGEN; RESOLUTION; SCATTERING; SIMULATION; TOMOGRAPHY

Citation Formats

Celata, C.M. Scientific issues in future induction linac accelerators for heavy ion fusion. United States: N. p., 2004. Web.
Celata, C.M. Scientific issues in future induction linac accelerators for heavy ion fusion. United States.
Celata, C.M. Mon . "Scientific issues in future induction linac accelerators for heavy ion fusion". United States. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/840029.
@article{osti_840029,
title = {Scientific issues in future induction linac accelerators for heavy ion fusion},
author = {Celata, C.M.},
abstractNote = {Achievement of atomic-resolution electron-beam tomography will allow determination of the three-dimensional structure of nanoparticles (and other suitable specimens) at atomic resolution. Three-dimensional reconstructions will yield ''section'' images that resolve atoms overlapped in normal electron microscope images (projections), resolving lighter atoms such as oxygen in the presence of heavier atoms, and atoms that lie on non-lattice sites such as those in non-periodic defect structures. Our first demonstrations of 3-D reconstruction to atomic resolution used five zone-axis images from test specimens of staurolite consisting of a mix of light and heavy atoms. We propose combining ultra-high (sub-Angstrom) resolution zone-axis images with off-zone images by first using linear reconstruction of the off-zone images while excluding images obtained within a small range of tilts (of the order of 60 milliradian) of any zone-axis orientation, since it has been shown that dynamical effects can be mitigated by slight off-axis tilt of the specimen. The (partial) reconstruction would then be used as a model for forward calculation by image simulation in zone-axis directions and the structure refined iteratively to achieve satisfactory fits with the experimental zone-axis data. Another path to atomic-resolution tomography would combine ''zone-axis tomography'' with high-resolution dark-field hollow-cone (DFHC) imaging. Electron diffraction theory indicates that dynamic (multiple) scattering is much reduced under highly-convergent illumination. DFHC TEM is the analog of HAADF STEM, and imaging theory shows that image resolution can be enhanced under these conditions. Images obtained in this mode could provide the initial reconstruction, with zone-axis images used for refinement.},
doi = {},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {Mon Jun 07 00:00:00 EDT 2004},
month = {Mon Jun 07 00:00:00 EDT 2004}
}

Conference:
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