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Title: High Frequency Planar Accelerating Structures for Future Linear Colliders

Abstract

Modern microfabrication techniques based on deep etch x-ray lithography (LIGA) can be used to produce large-aspect-ratio, metallic or dielectric, planar structures suitable for high-frequency RF acceleration of charged particle beams. Specifically, these techniques offer significant advantages over conventional manufacturing methods for future linear colliders (beyond NLC, the Next Linear Collider) because of several unique systems requirements. First, to have the required ac ''wall plug'' power within reasonable limits, such future linear colliders ({ge} 5TeV) must operate at high frequency ({ge} 30GHz). This implies the need of a large number of intricate accelerating structures with ever smaller dimensions and extremely tight manufacturing tolerances, imposing new challenges in mass-production, precision fabrication techniques. Microfabrication is particularly suitable for meeting this need. Secondly, luminosity requirements suggest the use of multi-bunch acceleration of electrons and positrons in the linear collider. In order for these schemes to accelerate low-emittance beams over a long distance, it is important that the wakefield effects be reduced to a minimum in the accelerating structure. Asymmetric planar structures have more geometric degrees of freedom than cylindrically symmetric structures. In addition to detuning, these can be utilized to further reduce the wakefields. Thirdly, in order to clearly discriminate physics events in themore » final interaction point at which electrons and positrons collide, it is required that secondary particle production from beamstrahlung be minimized. Flat electron and positron beams with a large aspect ratio will be beneficial in reducing beamstrahlung in the final focus region, but cause the beam to be more sensitive to wakefields in the vertical dimension. In principle, a flat beam can be accelerated in a planar structure with reduced wakefield in the vertical direction for the entire length of the accelerator.« less

Authors:
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC), Menlo Park, CA
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Science (SC)
OSTI Identifier:
839665
Report Number(s):
SLAC-PUB-11000
TRN: US0503508
DOE Contract Number:  
AC02-76SF00515
Resource Type:
Technical Report
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
43 PARTICLE ACCELERATORS; ACCELERATION; ACCURACY; ASPECT RATIO; CHARGED PARTICLES; DEGREES OF FREEDOM; DIMENSIONS; ELECTRONS; FABRICATION; LINEAR COLLIDERS; LUMINOSITY; MANUFACTURING; PARTICLE PRODUCTION; PHYSICS; POSITRON BEAMS; POSITRONS

Citation Formats

Yu, D. High Frequency Planar Accelerating Structures for Future Linear Colliders. United States: N. p., 2005. Web. doi:10.2172/839665.
Yu, D. High Frequency Planar Accelerating Structures for Future Linear Colliders. United States. https://doi.org/10.2172/839665
Yu, D. Wed . "High Frequency Planar Accelerating Structures for Future Linear Colliders". United States. https://doi.org/10.2172/839665. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/839665.
@article{osti_839665,
title = {High Frequency Planar Accelerating Structures for Future Linear Colliders},
author = {Yu, D},
abstractNote = {Modern microfabrication techniques based on deep etch x-ray lithography (LIGA) can be used to produce large-aspect-ratio, metallic or dielectric, planar structures suitable for high-frequency RF acceleration of charged particle beams. Specifically, these techniques offer significant advantages over conventional manufacturing methods for future linear colliders (beyond NLC, the Next Linear Collider) because of several unique systems requirements. First, to have the required ac ''wall plug'' power within reasonable limits, such future linear colliders ({ge} 5TeV) must operate at high frequency ({ge} 30GHz). This implies the need of a large number of intricate accelerating structures with ever smaller dimensions and extremely tight manufacturing tolerances, imposing new challenges in mass-production, precision fabrication techniques. Microfabrication is particularly suitable for meeting this need. Secondly, luminosity requirements suggest the use of multi-bunch acceleration of electrons and positrons in the linear collider. In order for these schemes to accelerate low-emittance beams over a long distance, it is important that the wakefield effects be reduced to a minimum in the accelerating structure. Asymmetric planar structures have more geometric degrees of freedom than cylindrically symmetric structures. In addition to detuning, these can be utilized to further reduce the wakefields. Thirdly, in order to clearly discriminate physics events in the final interaction point at which electrons and positrons collide, it is required that secondary particle production from beamstrahlung be minimized. Flat electron and positron beams with a large aspect ratio will be beneficial in reducing beamstrahlung in the final focus region, but cause the beam to be more sensitive to wakefields in the vertical dimension. In principle, a flat beam can be accelerated in a planar structure with reduced wakefield in the vertical direction for the entire length of the accelerator.},
doi = {10.2172/839665},
url = {https://www.osti.gov/biblio/839665}, journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {2005},
month = {1}
}