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Title: High Gradient Test of a Clamped, Molybdenum Iris, X-Band Accelerator Structure at NLCTA

Abstract

Inspired by the very high gradients (150-195 MV/m) achieved at CERN in 30 GHz accelerator structures made with tungsten and molybdenum irises and operated with short (16 ns) rf pulses [1], an X-band (11.4 GHz) version of this structure design was built at CERN and tested at SLAC. The goals of this experiment were to provide frequency scaling data on high gradient phenomena at similar pulse lengths, and to measure the structure performance at the longer pulse lengths available at SLAC (the CLIC test facility, CTF II, could provide only 16 ns pulses for high power operation and 32 ns pulses for medium power operation). Earlier high gradient tests of 21 GHz to 39 GHz standing-wave, single cells, indicated no significant frequency dependence of the maximum obtainable surface field [2]. The X-band scaling test would check if this was true for travelling-wave, multi-cell structures as well. For the experiment, the CLIC group at CERN built a 30 cell accelerating structure that consisted of copper cells and molybdenum irises that were clamped together. The structure was mounted in a vacuum tank and installed in the Next Linear Collider Test Accelerator (NLCTA) beam line at SLAC where it was operated at highmore » power for more than 700 hours.« less

Authors:
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Science (SC)
OSTI Identifier:
839600
Report Number(s):
SLAC-PUB-10551
TRN: US0503574
DOE Contract Number:  
AC02-76SF00515
Resource Type:
Technical Report
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
43 PARTICLE ACCELERATORS; ACCELERATORS; CERN; COPPER; DESIGN; FREQUENCY DEPENDENCE; LINEAR COLLIDERS; MOLYBDENUM; PERFORMANCE; STANFORD LINEAR ACCELERATOR CENTER; TANKS; TUNGSTEN

Citation Formats

Doebert, S. High Gradient Test of a Clamped, Molybdenum Iris, X-Band Accelerator Structure at NLCTA. United States: N. p., 2004. Web. doi:10.2172/839600.
Doebert, S. High Gradient Test of a Clamped, Molybdenum Iris, X-Band Accelerator Structure at NLCTA. United States. https://doi.org/10.2172/839600
Doebert, S. 2004. "High Gradient Test of a Clamped, Molybdenum Iris, X-Band Accelerator Structure at NLCTA". United States. https://doi.org/10.2172/839600. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/839600.
@article{osti_839600,
title = {High Gradient Test of a Clamped, Molybdenum Iris, X-Band Accelerator Structure at NLCTA},
author = {Doebert, S},
abstractNote = {Inspired by the very high gradients (150-195 MV/m) achieved at CERN in 30 GHz accelerator structures made with tungsten and molybdenum irises and operated with short (16 ns) rf pulses [1], an X-band (11.4 GHz) version of this structure design was built at CERN and tested at SLAC. The goals of this experiment were to provide frequency scaling data on high gradient phenomena at similar pulse lengths, and to measure the structure performance at the longer pulse lengths available at SLAC (the CLIC test facility, CTF II, could provide only 16 ns pulses for high power operation and 32 ns pulses for medium power operation). Earlier high gradient tests of 21 GHz to 39 GHz standing-wave, single cells, indicated no significant frequency dependence of the maximum obtainable surface field [2]. The X-band scaling test would check if this was true for travelling-wave, multi-cell structures as well. For the experiment, the CLIC group at CERN built a 30 cell accelerating structure that consisted of copper cells and molybdenum irises that were clamped together. The structure was mounted in a vacuum tank and installed in the Next Linear Collider Test Accelerator (NLCTA) beam line at SLAC where it was operated at high power for more than 700 hours.},
doi = {10.2172/839600},
url = {https://www.osti.gov/biblio/839600}, journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {2004},
month = {11}
}