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Title: Microsensors for In-situ Chemical, Physical and Radiological Characterization of Mixed Waste (73808)

Abstract

Portable, real-time, in-situ chemical, physical, and radiological sensors for the characterization and monitoring of transuranic waste, mixed waste, ground water, contaminated soil, and process streams are needed within the DOE complex. A continuation of this basic research program is proposed to study the influence of control of the electrochemical potential of a metallic coating on a microcantilever as a means of developing specific and highly sensitive sensors. Basic research will be needed to understand the influence of variation of electrochemical potential on the bending of cantilevers in an electrolyte solution. Changes in the chemical potential of a metal-electrolyte interface, affected by changing the applied potential, leads to a change in the depletion or accumulation of substances at the interface. This change in the surface excess at the interface is reflected in a change in the interfacial tension, which is sensitively detected as cantilever deflection. Deposition of electroactive heavy metals as well as the adsorption of metal oxide species will be detectable as a cantilever bending. We plan to continue field-testing cantilever sensors at DOE sites as appropriate. Practical sensors for Hg and CrO4 -2 have been developed, and the former has been field tested. A sensor for large poorly hydratedmore » anions (ClO4 -, ReO4 -, TcO4 -) based on a quarternary ammonium SAM coating is under development and will be field tested when appropriate. The advantage of cantilever sensors is that once the basic platform is developed, it can be the basis for a plethora of inexpensive, miniature sensors. This program will take advantage of advances in cantilever technology made by other programs as well.« less

Authors:
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Oak Ridge National Lab., Oak Ridge, TN (US)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Science (SC) (US)
OSTI Identifier:
838996
Report Number(s):
EMSP-73808-2004
R&D Project: EMSP 73808; TRN: US0501539
Resource Type:
Technical Report
Resource Relation:
Other Information: PBD: 1 Jun 2004
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
46 INSTRUMENTATION RELATED TO NUCLEAR SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY; 54 ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES; ADSORPTION; ANIONS; BENDING; COATINGS; DEPOSITION; ELECTROLYTES; GROUND WATER; MONITORING; OXIDES; RESEARCH PROGRAMS; WASTES

Citation Formats

Thundat, Thomas G. Microsensors for In-situ Chemical, Physical and Radiological Characterization of Mixed Waste (73808). United States: N. p., 2004. Web. doi:10.2172/838996.
Thundat, Thomas G. Microsensors for In-situ Chemical, Physical and Radiological Characterization of Mixed Waste (73808). United States. https://doi.org/10.2172/838996
Thundat, Thomas G. Tue . "Microsensors for In-situ Chemical, Physical and Radiological Characterization of Mixed Waste (73808)". United States. https://doi.org/10.2172/838996. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/838996.
@article{osti_838996,
title = {Microsensors for In-situ Chemical, Physical and Radiological Characterization of Mixed Waste (73808)},
author = {Thundat, Thomas G},
abstractNote = {Portable, real-time, in-situ chemical, physical, and radiological sensors for the characterization and monitoring of transuranic waste, mixed waste, ground water, contaminated soil, and process streams are needed within the DOE complex. A continuation of this basic research program is proposed to study the influence of control of the electrochemical potential of a metallic coating on a microcantilever as a means of developing specific and highly sensitive sensors. Basic research will be needed to understand the influence of variation of electrochemical potential on the bending of cantilevers in an electrolyte solution. Changes in the chemical potential of a metal-electrolyte interface, affected by changing the applied potential, leads to a change in the depletion or accumulation of substances at the interface. This change in the surface excess at the interface is reflected in a change in the interfacial tension, which is sensitively detected as cantilever deflection. Deposition of electroactive heavy metals as well as the adsorption of metal oxide species will be detectable as a cantilever bending. We plan to continue field-testing cantilever sensors at DOE sites as appropriate. Practical sensors for Hg and CrO4 -2 have been developed, and the former has been field tested. A sensor for large poorly hydrated anions (ClO4 -, ReO4 -, TcO4 -) based on a quarternary ammonium SAM coating is under development and will be field tested when appropriate. The advantage of cantilever sensors is that once the basic platform is developed, it can be the basis for a plethora of inexpensive, miniature sensors. This program will take advantage of advances in cantilever technology made by other programs as well.},
doi = {10.2172/838996},
url = {https://www.osti.gov/biblio/838996}, journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {2004},
month = {6}
}