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Title: Session 20: Injection Overview

Abstract

The test program was initiated at the Raft River Geothermal Field in southern Idaho in September 1982. A series of eight short-term injection and backflow tests, followed by a long-term injection test, were conducted on one well in the field. Tracers were added during injection and monitored during backflow as well. The principal objective was to determine if tracers could be effectively used as a means to assess reservoir characteristics in a one-well test. The test program resulted in a unique data set which shows promise as a means to improve understanding of the reservoir characteristics. In December 1982, an RFP was issued to obtain an industrial partner to obtain follow-on data on the injection/backflow technique in a second field, and to study any alternate advanced concepts for injection testing which the industrial community might recommend. The East Mesa Geothermal Field was selected for the second test series. Two wells were utilized for testing, and a series of ten tests were conducted in July and August 1983, aimed principally at further evaluation of the injection/backflow technique.

Authors:
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
USDOE, Idaho Operations (US)
Sponsoring Org.:
U.S. Department of Energy Assistant Secretary, Conservation and Renewable Energy, Division of Geothermal and Hydropower Technologies; Washington, D.C. (US)
OSTI Identifier:
838162
Report Number(s):
CONF-8310177-20
TRN: US200508%%266
Resource Type:
Conference
Resource Relation:
Conference: Proceedings of the Geothermal Program Review II, Washington, DC (US), 10/11/1983--10/13/1983; Other Information: Page range is 383-399; Includes graphs, schematics; PBD: 1 Dec 1983
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
15 GEOTHERMAL ENERGY; EAST MESA GEOTHERMAL FIELD; EVALUATION; GEOTHERMAL FIELDS; TESTING; GEOTHERMAL LEGACY

Citation Formats

Prestwich, Susan. Session 20: Injection Overview. United States: N. p., 1983. Web.
Prestwich, Susan. Session 20: Injection Overview. United States.
Prestwich, Susan. 1983. "Session 20: Injection Overview". United States. doi:. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/838162.
@article{osti_838162,
title = {Session 20: Injection Overview},
author = {Prestwich, Susan},
abstractNote = {The test program was initiated at the Raft River Geothermal Field in southern Idaho in September 1982. A series of eight short-term injection and backflow tests, followed by a long-term injection test, were conducted on one well in the field. Tracers were added during injection and monitored during backflow as well. The principal objective was to determine if tracers could be effectively used as a means to assess reservoir characteristics in a one-well test. The test program resulted in a unique data set which shows promise as a means to improve understanding of the reservoir characteristics. In December 1982, an RFP was issued to obtain an industrial partner to obtain follow-on data on the injection/backflow technique in a second field, and to study any alternate advanced concepts for injection testing which the industrial community might recommend. The East Mesa Geothermal Field was selected for the second test series. Two wells were utilized for testing, and a series of ten tests were conducted in July and August 1983, aimed principally at further evaluation of the injection/backflow technique.},
doi = {},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = 1983,
month =
}

Conference:
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