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Title: Short-term and long-term Vadose zone monitoring: Current technologies, development, and applications

Abstract

At Hanford, Savannah River, Oak Ridge, Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL), and other DOE sites, field vadose zone observations have shown complex water seepage and mass transport behavior in a highly heterogeneous, thick vadose zone on a variety of scales. Recent investigation showed that severe contamination of soils and groundwater by organic contaminant and nuclear waste occurred because of water seepage and contaminant transport along localized, preferential, fast flow within the heterogeneous vadose zone. However, most of the existing characterization and monitoring methods are not able to locate these localized and persistent preferential pathways associated with specific heterogeneous geologic features, such as clastic dikes, caliche layers, or fractures. In addition, changes in the chemical composition of moving and indigenous solutes, particularly sodium concentration, redox conditions, biological transformation of organic materials, and high temperature, may significantly alter water, chemicals, and bio-transformation exchange between the zones of fast flow and the rest of the media. In this paper, using the data from Hanford and INEEL sites, we will (1) present evidence that central problems of the vadose zone investigations are associated with preferential, fast flow phenomena and accelerated migration of organic and radioactive elements, (2) identify gaps in current characterizationmore » and monitoring technologies, and (3) recommend actions for the development of advanced vadose zone characterization and monitoring methods using a combination of hydrologic, geochemical, and geophysical techniques.« less

Authors:
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE. Subsurface Contamination Focus Area (US)
OSTI Identifier:
838056
Report Number(s):
LBNL-43408
R&D Project: 465103; TRN: US0501238
DOE Contract Number:  
AC03-76SF00098
Resource Type:
Technical Report
Resource Relation:
Other Information: PBD: 1 May 1999
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
12 MANAGEMENT OF RADIOACTIVE WASTES, AND NON-RADIOACTIVE WASTES FROM NUCLEAR FACILITIES; 58 GEOSCIENCES; CHEMICAL COMPOSITION; CONTAMINATION; FRACTURES; MONITORING; RADIOACTIVE WASTES; SODIUM; SOILS; SOLUTES; TRANSFORMATIONS; TRANSPORT; WATER

Citation Formats

Faybishenko, Boris. Short-term and long-term Vadose zone monitoring: Current technologies, development, and applications. United States: N. p., 1999. Web. doi:10.2172/838056.
Faybishenko, Boris. Short-term and long-term Vadose zone monitoring: Current technologies, development, and applications. United States. doi:10.2172/838056.
Faybishenko, Boris. Sat . "Short-term and long-term Vadose zone monitoring: Current technologies, development, and applications". United States. doi:10.2172/838056. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/838056.
@article{osti_838056,
title = {Short-term and long-term Vadose zone monitoring: Current technologies, development, and applications},
author = {Faybishenko, Boris},
abstractNote = {At Hanford, Savannah River, Oak Ridge, Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL), and other DOE sites, field vadose zone observations have shown complex water seepage and mass transport behavior in a highly heterogeneous, thick vadose zone on a variety of scales. Recent investigation showed that severe contamination of soils and groundwater by organic contaminant and nuclear waste occurred because of water seepage and contaminant transport along localized, preferential, fast flow within the heterogeneous vadose zone. However, most of the existing characterization and monitoring methods are not able to locate these localized and persistent preferential pathways associated with specific heterogeneous geologic features, such as clastic dikes, caliche layers, or fractures. In addition, changes in the chemical composition of moving and indigenous solutes, particularly sodium concentration, redox conditions, biological transformation of organic materials, and high temperature, may significantly alter water, chemicals, and bio-transformation exchange between the zones of fast flow and the rest of the media. In this paper, using the data from Hanford and INEEL sites, we will (1) present evidence that central problems of the vadose zone investigations are associated with preferential, fast flow phenomena and accelerated migration of organic and radioactive elements, (2) identify gaps in current characterization and monitoring technologies, and (3) recommend actions for the development of advanced vadose zone characterization and monitoring methods using a combination of hydrologic, geochemical, and geophysical techniques.},
doi = {10.2172/838056},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {Sat May 01 00:00:00 EDT 1999},
month = {Sat May 01 00:00:00 EDT 1999}
}

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