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Title: Could there be a hole in type Ia supernovae?

Abstract

In the favored progenitor scenario, Type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia) arise from a white dwarf accreting material from a non-degenerate companion star. Soon after the white dwarf explodes, the ejected supernova material engulfs the companion star; two-dimensional hydrodynamical simulations by Marietta et al. (2001) show that, in the interaction, the companion star carves out a conical hole of opening angle 30-40 degrees in the supernova ejecta. In this paper we use multi-dimensional Monte Carlo radiative transfer calculations to explore the observable consequences of an ejecta-hole asymmetry. We calculate the variation of the spectrum, luminosity, and polarization with viewing angle for the aspherical supernova near maximum light. We find that the supernova looks normal from almost all viewing angles except when one looks almost directly down the hole. In the latter case, one sees into the deeper, hotter layers of ejecta. The supernova is relatively brighter and has a peculiar spectrum characterized by more highly ionized species, weaker absorption features, and lower absorption velocities. The spectrum viewed down the hole is comparable to the class of SN 1991T-like supernovae. We consider how the ejecta-hole asymmetry may explain the current spectropolarimetric observations of SNe Ia, and suggest a few observational signatures ofmore » the geometry. Finally, we discuss the variety currently seen in observed SNe Ia and how an ejecta-hole asymmetry may fit in as one of several possible sources of diversity.« less

Authors:
; ; ;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Director. Office of Science. Office of Advanced Scientific Computing Research; Nation Aeronautics and Space Administration (US)
OSTI Identifier:
836970
Report Number(s):
LBNL-54943
R&D Project: KX0410; TRN: US0500853
DOE Contract Number:  
AC03-76SF00098
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Journal Name:
Astrophysical Journal
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 610; Journal Issue: 2 pt1; Other Information: Submitted to Astrophysical Journal: Volume 610, No.2 part 1; Journal Publication Date: 08/01/2004; PBD: 23 Apr 2004
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
71 CLASSICAL AND QUANTUM MECHANICS, GENERAL PHYSICS; 72 PHYSICS OF ELEMENTARY PARTICLES AND FIELDS; 73 NUCLEAR PHYSICS AND RADIATION PHYSICS; ABSORPTION; ASYMMETRY; GEOMETRY; LUMINOSITY; OPENINGS; POLARIZATION; RADIANT HEAT TRANSFER; STARS; SUPERNOVAE; THERMONUCLEAR SUPERNOVAE 3-D RADIATIVE TRANSFER SPECTRUM SYNTHESIS

Citation Formats

Kasen, Daniel, Nugent, Peter, Thomas, R.C., and Wang, Lifan. Could there be a hole in type Ia supernovae?. United States: N. p., 2004. Web. doi:10.1086/421699.
Kasen, Daniel, Nugent, Peter, Thomas, R.C., & Wang, Lifan. Could there be a hole in type Ia supernovae?. United States. doi:10.1086/421699.
Kasen, Daniel, Nugent, Peter, Thomas, R.C., and Wang, Lifan. Fri . "Could there be a hole in type Ia supernovae?". United States. doi:10.1086/421699. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/836970.
@article{osti_836970,
title = {Could there be a hole in type Ia supernovae?},
author = {Kasen, Daniel and Nugent, Peter and Thomas, R.C. and Wang, Lifan},
abstractNote = {In the favored progenitor scenario, Type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia) arise from a white dwarf accreting material from a non-degenerate companion star. Soon after the white dwarf explodes, the ejected supernova material engulfs the companion star; two-dimensional hydrodynamical simulations by Marietta et al. (2001) show that, in the interaction, the companion star carves out a conical hole of opening angle 30-40 degrees in the supernova ejecta. In this paper we use multi-dimensional Monte Carlo radiative transfer calculations to explore the observable consequences of an ejecta-hole asymmetry. We calculate the variation of the spectrum, luminosity, and polarization with viewing angle for the aspherical supernova near maximum light. We find that the supernova looks normal from almost all viewing angles except when one looks almost directly down the hole. In the latter case, one sees into the deeper, hotter layers of ejecta. The supernova is relatively brighter and has a peculiar spectrum characterized by more highly ionized species, weaker absorption features, and lower absorption velocities. The spectrum viewed down the hole is comparable to the class of SN 1991T-like supernovae. We consider how the ejecta-hole asymmetry may explain the current spectropolarimetric observations of SNe Ia, and suggest a few observational signatures of the geometry. Finally, we discuss the variety currently seen in observed SNe Ia and how an ejecta-hole asymmetry may fit in as one of several possible sources of diversity.},
doi = {10.1086/421699},
journal = {Astrophysical Journal},
number = 2 pt1,
volume = 610,
place = {United States},
year = {2004},
month = {4}
}