skip to main content
OSTI.GOV title logo U.S. Department of Energy
Office of Scientific and Technical Information

Title: FULL SCALE REGENERABLE HEPA FILTER DESIGN USING SINTERED METAL FILTER ELEMENTS

Abstract

A Department of Energy funded contract involved the development of porous metal as a HEPA filter, and the subsequent design of a full-scale regenerable HEPA filtration system (RHFS). This RHFS could replace the glass fiber HEPA filters currently being used on the high level waste (HLW) tank ventilation system with a system that would be moisture tolerant, durable, and cleanable in place. The origins of the contract are a 1996 investigation at the Savannah River Technology Center (SRTC) regarding the use of porous metal as a HEPA filter material. This contract was divided into Phases I, IIA and IIB. Phase I of the contract evaluated simple filter cylinders in a simulated High Level Waste (HLW) environment and the ability to clean and regenerate the filter media after fouling. Upon the successful completion of Phase I, Phase IIA was conducted, which included lab scale prototype testing and design of a full-scale system. The work completed under Phase IIA included development of a full-scale system design, development of a filter media meeting the HEPA filtration efficiency that would also be regenerable using prescribed cleaning procedures, and the testing of a single element system prototype at Savannah River. All contract objectives were met.more » The filter media selected was a nickel material already under development at Mott, which met the HEPA filtration efficiency standard. The Mott nickel media met and exceeded the HEPA requirement, providing 99.99% removal against a requirement of 99.97%. Double open-ended elements of this media were provided to the Savannah River Test Center for HLW simulation testing in the single element prototype filter. These elements performed well and further demonstrated the practicality of a metallic media regenerable HEPA filter system. An evaluation of the manufacturing method on many elements demonstrated the reproducibility to meet the HEPA filtration requirement. The full-scale design of the Mott RHFS incorporated several important features in its design and operation. The element bundle would be an all welded assembly, which could be removed and replaced as a unit if the elements ever needed replacement. Each element had a spray nozzle mounted above it for cleaning; it could also be cleaned by a soak and backwash technique. The inlet nozzle incorporated a cyclonic separator to initially remove large suspended material and droplets. Tests indicated a significant reduction of dirt load getting to the filter elements, which would extend the operating time between cleanings. A high capacity blower was selected to overcome the higher pressure drop of the metallic elements. The blower, having a 25 horsepower motor, would be capable of operating the system to higher pressure drops than available on the glass fiber HEPA filters. This additional capacity further increases the operating duration of the filter. Upon successful testing and acceptance of the full-scale design, Phase IIB would involve the construction and test of a full-scale prototype system on an actual HLW tank. Phase IIA was completed but for funding and priority reasons the contract was halted; thus Phase IIB would not be pursued at this time. The Mott RHFS has been proven at each stage of the development process to meet the requirements of a suitable replacement system for the glass fiber HEPA filters enabling great cost savings. It remains to test a full-scale operating system on an actual high level waste tank to fully demonstrate the performance and anticipated cost savings of the Mott RHFS. Mott is confident that the performance will be more than acceptable.« less

Authors:
; ;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Mott Corporation (US)
Sponsoring Org.:
(US)
OSTI Identifier:
834564
DOE Contract Number:  
AC26-99FT40570
Resource Type:
Technical Report
Resource Relation:
Other Information: PBD: 27 Nov 2002
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
12 MANAGEMENT OF RADIOACTIVE WASTES, AND NON-RADIOACTIVE WASTES FROM NUCLEAR FACILITIES; AIR FILTERS; DESIGN; REGENERATION; OFF-GAS SYSTEMS; STORAGE FACILITIES; RADIOACTIVE WASTE STORAGE; HIGH-LEVEL RADIOACTIVE WASTES; EFFICIENCY; FILTRATION; FOULING; NICKEL; PERFORMANCE TESTING

Citation Formats

Gil Ramos, Kenneth Rubow, and Ronald Sekellick. FULL SCALE REGENERABLE HEPA FILTER DESIGN USING SINTERED METAL FILTER ELEMENTS. United States: N. p., 2002. Web. doi:10.2172/834564.
Gil Ramos, Kenneth Rubow, & Ronald Sekellick. FULL SCALE REGENERABLE HEPA FILTER DESIGN USING SINTERED METAL FILTER ELEMENTS. United States. doi:10.2172/834564.
Gil Ramos, Kenneth Rubow, and Ronald Sekellick. Wed . "FULL SCALE REGENERABLE HEPA FILTER DESIGN USING SINTERED METAL FILTER ELEMENTS". United States. doi:10.2172/834564. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/834564.
@article{osti_834564,
title = {FULL SCALE REGENERABLE HEPA FILTER DESIGN USING SINTERED METAL FILTER ELEMENTS},
author = {Gil Ramos and Kenneth Rubow and Ronald Sekellick},
abstractNote = {A Department of Energy funded contract involved the development of porous metal as a HEPA filter, and the subsequent design of a full-scale regenerable HEPA filtration system (RHFS). This RHFS could replace the glass fiber HEPA filters currently being used on the high level waste (HLW) tank ventilation system with a system that would be moisture tolerant, durable, and cleanable in place. The origins of the contract are a 1996 investigation at the Savannah River Technology Center (SRTC) regarding the use of porous metal as a HEPA filter material. This contract was divided into Phases I, IIA and IIB. Phase I of the contract evaluated simple filter cylinders in a simulated High Level Waste (HLW) environment and the ability to clean and regenerate the filter media after fouling. Upon the successful completion of Phase I, Phase IIA was conducted, which included lab scale prototype testing and design of a full-scale system. The work completed under Phase IIA included development of a full-scale system design, development of a filter media meeting the HEPA filtration efficiency that would also be regenerable using prescribed cleaning procedures, and the testing of a single element system prototype at Savannah River. All contract objectives were met. The filter media selected was a nickel material already under development at Mott, which met the HEPA filtration efficiency standard. The Mott nickel media met and exceeded the HEPA requirement, providing 99.99% removal against a requirement of 99.97%. Double open-ended elements of this media were provided to the Savannah River Test Center for HLW simulation testing in the single element prototype filter. These elements performed well and further demonstrated the practicality of a metallic media regenerable HEPA filter system. An evaluation of the manufacturing method on many elements demonstrated the reproducibility to meet the HEPA filtration requirement. The full-scale design of the Mott RHFS incorporated several important features in its design and operation. The element bundle would be an all welded assembly, which could be removed and replaced as a unit if the elements ever needed replacement. Each element had a spray nozzle mounted above it for cleaning; it could also be cleaned by a soak and backwash technique. The inlet nozzle incorporated a cyclonic separator to initially remove large suspended material and droplets. Tests indicated a significant reduction of dirt load getting to the filter elements, which would extend the operating time between cleanings. A high capacity blower was selected to overcome the higher pressure drop of the metallic elements. The blower, having a 25 horsepower motor, would be capable of operating the system to higher pressure drops than available on the glass fiber HEPA filters. This additional capacity further increases the operating duration of the filter. Upon successful testing and acceptance of the full-scale design, Phase IIB would involve the construction and test of a full-scale prototype system on an actual HLW tank. Phase IIA was completed but for funding and priority reasons the contract was halted; thus Phase IIB would not be pursued at this time. The Mott RHFS has been proven at each stage of the development process to meet the requirements of a suitable replacement system for the glass fiber HEPA filters enabling great cost savings. It remains to test a full-scale operating system on an actual high level waste tank to fully demonstrate the performance and anticipated cost savings of the Mott RHFS. Mott is confident that the performance will be more than acceptable.},
doi = {10.2172/834564},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {2002},
month = {11}
}