skip to main content
OSTI.GOV title logo U.S. Department of Energy
Office of Scientific and Technical Information

Title: Compact Gamma-Ray Imager for In-Vivo Gene Imaging

Abstract

A compact, low-cost, gamma-ray imaging system is needed to study gene expression in small animals. State-of-the-art electronic imaging systems have insufficient resolution and animals must be sacrificed for detailed imaging that precludes time evolution studies. With improved electronics radioactive tracers attached to gene markers can be used to track the absorption and mobility of gene therapy medications in live animals. Other instrumentation being developed for medical applications does not have the response to match the radiation source for this work. The objective of this research was to develop thick film (Cd,Zn)Te detectors matched to the gamma ray energy of {sup 129}I. The detector would be a direct readout device using p-i-n diodes formed from the high Z material absorbing the radiation, with separate readout. Higher quality semiconducting material was expected from epitaxial growth on GaAs, a near lattice matched substrate. In practice, it was difficult to obtain material with high resistance and low leakage current. Spire Corporation achieved the goal of fabricating working detectors in (Cd,Zn)Te deposited on GaAs. The spectra of an alpha emitter ({sup 225}Am) was adequately resolved in thin film devices. Thick p-i-n diodes were fabricated but other processing problems prevented full demonstration of a gamma raymore » detector.« less

Authors:
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Spire Corporation, Bedford, MA (US)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Energy Research (ER) (US)
OSTI Identifier:
833940
Report Number(s):
FR-60425
TRN: US200504%%65
DOE Contract Number:  
FG02-99ER82892
Resource Type:
Technical Report
Resource Relation:
Other Information: PBD: 1 Jun 2000
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
59 BASIC BIOLOGICAL SCIENCES; ABSORPTION; ANIMALS; GENE THERAPY; GENES; IN VIVO; LEAKAGE CURRENT; PROCESSING; RADIATION SOURCES; RESOLUTION; SPECTRA; THIN FILMS

Citation Formats

Greenwald, A. C. Compact Gamma-Ray Imager for In-Vivo Gene Imaging. United States: N. p., 2000. Web. doi:10.2172/833940.
Greenwald, A. C. Compact Gamma-Ray Imager for In-Vivo Gene Imaging. United States. doi:10.2172/833940.
Greenwald, A. C. Thu . "Compact Gamma-Ray Imager for In-Vivo Gene Imaging". United States. doi:10.2172/833940. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/833940.
@article{osti_833940,
title = {Compact Gamma-Ray Imager for In-Vivo Gene Imaging},
author = {Greenwald, A. C.},
abstractNote = {A compact, low-cost, gamma-ray imaging system is needed to study gene expression in small animals. State-of-the-art electronic imaging systems have insufficient resolution and animals must be sacrificed for detailed imaging that precludes time evolution studies. With improved electronics radioactive tracers attached to gene markers can be used to track the absorption and mobility of gene therapy medications in live animals. Other instrumentation being developed for medical applications does not have the response to match the radiation source for this work. The objective of this research was to develop thick film (Cd,Zn)Te detectors matched to the gamma ray energy of {sup 129}I. The detector would be a direct readout device using p-i-n diodes formed from the high Z material absorbing the radiation, with separate readout. Higher quality semiconducting material was expected from epitaxial growth on GaAs, a near lattice matched substrate. In practice, it was difficult to obtain material with high resistance and low leakage current. Spire Corporation achieved the goal of fabricating working detectors in (Cd,Zn)Te deposited on GaAs. The spectra of an alpha emitter ({sup 225}Am) was adequately resolved in thin film devices. Thick p-i-n diodes were fabricated but other processing problems prevented full demonstration of a gamma ray detector.},
doi = {10.2172/833940},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {2000},
month = {6}
}