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Title: Electrically Driven Technologies for Radioactive Aerosol Abatement

Abstract

The objective of this research program is to develop an improved understanding of how electrically driven processes, including electrocoalescence, acoustic agglomeration, and electric filtration, may be employed to efficiently treat problems caused by the formation of aerosols during DOE waste treatment operations. The production of aerosols during treatment and retrieval operations in radioactive waste tanks and during thermal treatment operations such as calcination presents a significant problem of cost, worker exposure, potential for release, and increased waste volume. Electrically driven technologies offer promise as remote technologies for improved treatment; however, existing theoretical models are not suitable for prediction and design. The basis for the project is the general fact that for most particulate collection technology, the marginal collection efficiency increases as the aerosol to be separated increases in size. Using this as a premise, we are investigating mechanisms for increasing the size of particles in an effluent stream as a preprocessing step. Our work is aimed at employing recent advances in theoretical approaches and experimental techniques to improve our understanding of how electrical and acoustic methods may be employed most efficiently alone or in tandem to tackle aerosol problems. The fundamental understanding achieved may provide the basis for development ofmore » innovative new approaches and for optimizing removal processes.« less

Authors:
; ; ;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Oak Ridge National Lab., Oak Ridge, TN; University of Texas at Austin, Austin, Texas (US)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Environmental Management (EM) (US)
OSTI Identifier:
833176
Report Number(s):
EMSP-65328-2000
R&D Project: EMSP 65328; TRN: US0406439
DOE Contract Number:  
FG07-98ER14937
Resource Type:
Technical Report
Resource Relation:
Other Information: PBD: 1 Jun 2000
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
12 MANAGEMENT OF RADIOACTIVE WASTES, AND NON-RADIOACTIVE WASTES FROM NUCLEAR FACILITIES; 54 ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES; ACOUSTICS; AEROSOLS; AGGLOMERATION; CALCINATION; DESIGN; EFFICIENCY; FILTRATION; FORECASTING; PARTICULATES; RADIOACTIVE AEROSOLS; RADIOACTIVE WASTES; REMOVAL; RESEARCH PROGRAMS; TANKS; WASTE PROCESSING; WASTES

Citation Formats

DePaoli, David W, Ezekoye, Ofodike A, Tsouris, Costas, and de Almeida, Valmor F. Electrically Driven Technologies for Radioactive Aerosol Abatement. United States: N. p., 2000. Web. doi:10.2172/833176.
DePaoli, David W, Ezekoye, Ofodike A, Tsouris, Costas, & de Almeida, Valmor F. Electrically Driven Technologies for Radioactive Aerosol Abatement. United States. doi:10.2172/833176.
DePaoli, David W, Ezekoye, Ofodike A, Tsouris, Costas, and de Almeida, Valmor F. Thu . "Electrically Driven Technologies for Radioactive Aerosol Abatement". United States. doi:10.2172/833176. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/833176.
@article{osti_833176,
title = {Electrically Driven Technologies for Radioactive Aerosol Abatement},
author = {DePaoli, David W and Ezekoye, Ofodike A and Tsouris, Costas and de Almeida, Valmor F},
abstractNote = {The objective of this research program is to develop an improved understanding of how electrically driven processes, including electrocoalescence, acoustic agglomeration, and electric filtration, may be employed to efficiently treat problems caused by the formation of aerosols during DOE waste treatment operations. The production of aerosols during treatment and retrieval operations in radioactive waste tanks and during thermal treatment operations such as calcination presents a significant problem of cost, worker exposure, potential for release, and increased waste volume. Electrically driven technologies offer promise as remote technologies for improved treatment; however, existing theoretical models are not suitable for prediction and design. The basis for the project is the general fact that for most particulate collection technology, the marginal collection efficiency increases as the aerosol to be separated increases in size. Using this as a premise, we are investigating mechanisms for increasing the size of particles in an effluent stream as a preprocessing step. Our work is aimed at employing recent advances in theoretical approaches and experimental techniques to improve our understanding of how electrical and acoustic methods may be employed most efficiently alone or in tandem to tackle aerosol problems. The fundamental understanding achieved may provide the basis for development of innovative new approaches and for optimizing removal processes.},
doi = {10.2172/833176},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {2000},
month = {6}
}

Technical Report:

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