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Title: Phase Chemistry of Tank Sludge Residual Components

Abstract

About four or five distinct reprocessing technologies were used at various times in Hanford's history. After removing U and Pu (or later 137Cs and 90Sr), the strongly acidic HLW was ''neutralized'' to high pH (>13) and stored in steel-lined tanks. High pH was necessary to prevent tank corrosion. While each technology produced chemically distinct waste, all wastes were similar in that they were high pH, concentrated, aqueous solutions. Dominant dissolved metals were Fe and/or Al, usually followed by Ni, Mn, or Cr. In an effort to reduce waste volume, many of the wastes were placed in evaporators or allowed to ''self-boil'' from the heat produced by their own radioactive decay. Consequently, today's HLW has been aging at temperatures ranging from 20 to 160 C. Previous studies of synthetic HLW sludge analogues have varied in their exact synthesis procedures and recipes, although each involved ''neutralization'' of acidic nitrate salt solutions by concentrated NaOH. Some recipes included small amounts of Si, SO4 2-, CO3 2-, and other minor chemical components in the Hanford sludges. The work being conducted at the University of Colorado differs from previous studies and from parallel current investigations at Sandia National Laboratories in the simplicity of the syntheticmore » sludge we are investigating. We are emphasizing the dominant role of Fe and Al, and secondarily, the effects of Ni and Si on the aging kinetics of the solid phases in the sludge.« less

Authors:
;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Department of Geological Sciences, University of Colorado, Boulder, CO (US)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Environmental Management (EM) (US)
OSTI Identifier:
831171
Report Number(s):
EMSP-60403-2000
R&D Project: EMSP-60403; TRN: US0405915
DOE Contract Number:  
FG07-97ER14834
Resource Type:
Technical Report
Resource Relation:
Other Information: PBD: 1 Jun 2000
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
11 NUCLEAR FUEL CYCLE AND FUEL MATERIALS; 54 ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES; 37 INORGANIC, ORGANIC, PHYSICAL AND ANALYTICAL CHEMISTRY; AGING; AQUEOUS SOLUTIONS; CHEMISTRY; CORROSION; DECAY; EVAPORATORS; KINETICS; NITRATES; REPROCESSING; SANDIA NATIONAL LABORATORIES; SLUDGES; SYNTHESIS; TANKS; WASTES

Citation Formats

Krumhansl, James L, and Nagy, Kathryn L. Phase Chemistry of Tank Sludge Residual Components. United States: N. p., 2000. Web. doi:10.2172/831171.
Krumhansl, James L, & Nagy, Kathryn L. Phase Chemistry of Tank Sludge Residual Components. United States. doi:10.2172/831171.
Krumhansl, James L, and Nagy, Kathryn L. Thu . "Phase Chemistry of Tank Sludge Residual Components". United States. doi:10.2172/831171. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/831171.
@article{osti_831171,
title = {Phase Chemistry of Tank Sludge Residual Components},
author = {Krumhansl, James L and Nagy, Kathryn L},
abstractNote = {About four or five distinct reprocessing technologies were used at various times in Hanford's history. After removing U and Pu (or later 137Cs and 90Sr), the strongly acidic HLW was ''neutralized'' to high pH (>13) and stored in steel-lined tanks. High pH was necessary to prevent tank corrosion. While each technology produced chemically distinct waste, all wastes were similar in that they were high pH, concentrated, aqueous solutions. Dominant dissolved metals were Fe and/or Al, usually followed by Ni, Mn, or Cr. In an effort to reduce waste volume, many of the wastes were placed in evaporators or allowed to ''self-boil'' from the heat produced by their own radioactive decay. Consequently, today's HLW has been aging at temperatures ranging from 20 to 160 C. Previous studies of synthetic HLW sludge analogues have varied in their exact synthesis procedures and recipes, although each involved ''neutralization'' of acidic nitrate salt solutions by concentrated NaOH. Some recipes included small amounts of Si, SO4 2-, CO3 2-, and other minor chemical components in the Hanford sludges. The work being conducted at the University of Colorado differs from previous studies and from parallel current investigations at Sandia National Laboratories in the simplicity of the synthetic sludge we are investigating. We are emphasizing the dominant role of Fe and Al, and secondarily, the effects of Ni and Si on the aging kinetics of the solid phases in the sludge.},
doi = {10.2172/831171},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {Thu Jun 01 00:00:00 EDT 2000},
month = {Thu Jun 01 00:00:00 EDT 2000}
}

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