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Title: Engineering Radioactive Stents for the Prevention of Restenosis

Abstract

Radiation has become an accepted treatment for the prevention of restenosis (re-blockage) of coronary arteries following angioplasty. Radioactive stents could be the easiest method of delivery for the radiation, although clinical trials were disappointing. One likely reason was the choice of P-32 as the radionuclide, which fails to match the biological needs of the problem. What radionuclide would perform best remains unknown. This project established the physical infrastructure necessary for a rational investigation to determine the optimum radiological characteristics for radioactive stents in the prevention of restenosis following angioplasty. The project investigated methods to activate coronary stents with radionuclides that spanned a range of energies and radiation types that could provide a mapping of the biological response. The project also provided calibration methods to determine the strength of the stents, an a process to calculate the dose distribution actually delivered to the patient's artery--quantities necessary for any future scientific study to improve the effectiveness of radioactive stents. Such studies could benefit the thousands of patients who receive angioplasty each year.

Authors:
; ; ; ; ; ; ; ;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, WI (US)
Sponsoring Org.:
Nuclear Science (US)
OSTI Identifier:
831121
Report Number(s):
DOE/ID14107-3
TRN: US0405696
DOE Contract Number:  
FG07-01ID14107
Resource Type:
Technical Report
Resource Relation:
Other Information: PBD: 10 Sep 2004
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
07 ISOTOPES AND RADIATION SOURCES; 43 PARTICLE ACCELERATORS; 46 INSTRUMENTATION RELATED TO NUCLEAR SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY; 60 APPLIED LIFE SCIENCES; 62 RADIOLOGY AND NUCLEAR MEDICINE; ARTERIES; CALIBRATION; CLINICAL TRIALS; PATIENTS; RADIATION DOSE DISTRIBUTIONS; RADIATIONS; RADIOISOTOPES; INTRAVASCUALR BRACHYTHERAPY; RADIOACTIVE STENTS; BRACHYTHERAPY CALIBRATION; INTRAVASCULAR BRACHTHERAPY DOSE CALCULATIONS; BRACHYTHERAPY DOSIMETRY

Citation Formats

Bruce Thomadsen, Robert J. Nickles, Larry DeWerd, Douglass Henderson, Jonathan Nye, Wes Culberson, Stephen Peterson, Michael Meltsner, and Liyong Lin. Engineering Radioactive Stents for the Prevention of Restenosis. United States: N. p., 2004. Web. doi:10.2172/831121.
Bruce Thomadsen, Robert J. Nickles, Larry DeWerd, Douglass Henderson, Jonathan Nye, Wes Culberson, Stephen Peterson, Michael Meltsner, & Liyong Lin. Engineering Radioactive Stents for the Prevention of Restenosis. United States. doi:10.2172/831121.
Bruce Thomadsen, Robert J. Nickles, Larry DeWerd, Douglass Henderson, Jonathan Nye, Wes Culberson, Stephen Peterson, Michael Meltsner, and Liyong Lin. Fri . "Engineering Radioactive Stents for the Prevention of Restenosis". United States. doi:10.2172/831121. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/831121.
@article{osti_831121,
title = {Engineering Radioactive Stents for the Prevention of Restenosis},
author = {Bruce Thomadsen and Robert J. Nickles and Larry DeWerd and Douglass Henderson and Jonathan Nye and Wes Culberson and Stephen Peterson and Michael Meltsner and Liyong Lin},
abstractNote = {Radiation has become an accepted treatment for the prevention of restenosis (re-blockage) of coronary arteries following angioplasty. Radioactive stents could be the easiest method of delivery for the radiation, although clinical trials were disappointing. One likely reason was the choice of P-32 as the radionuclide, which fails to match the biological needs of the problem. What radionuclide would perform best remains unknown. This project established the physical infrastructure necessary for a rational investigation to determine the optimum radiological characteristics for radioactive stents in the prevention of restenosis following angioplasty. The project investigated methods to activate coronary stents with radionuclides that spanned a range of energies and radiation types that could provide a mapping of the biological response. The project also provided calibration methods to determine the strength of the stents, an a process to calculate the dose distribution actually delivered to the patient's artery--quantities necessary for any future scientific study to improve the effectiveness of radioactive stents. Such studies could benefit the thousands of patients who receive angioplasty each year.},
doi = {10.2172/831121},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {2004},
month = {9}
}