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Title: Reflection and Ground Penetrating Radar for Environmental Site Characterization

Abstract

(1) To examine the complementary site-characterization capabilities of modern, three-component shallow seismic reflection (SSR) techniques and ground-penetrating radar (GPR) methods at depths ranging from 2 to 8 m at an existing test site; (2) To demonstrate the usefulness of the two methods when used in concert to characterize, in three dimensions, the cone of depression of a pumping well that will serve as a proxy site for fluid-flow at an actual, polluted site; (3) To use the site as an outdoor mesoscale laboratory to validate existing three-dimensional ground-penetrating radar and seismic-reflection computer models developed at the University of Kansas. To do this, seismic and GPR data are being collected along the same line(s) and within the same depth range. The principal investigators selected a site in central Kansas as a primary location. Although the site itself is not environmentally sensitive, the area offers attributes that are particularly useful for this research and allow the site to serve as a proxy for areas that are contaminated. As part of an effort to evaluate the strengths of each method, the seismic and GPR surveys have been repeated on a seasonal basis to establish how the complementary information obtained varies over time. Becausemore » the water table fluctuates seasonally at this site, variations in the two types of data over time also can be observed. Such noninvasive, in-situ methods of identifying and characterizing the hydrologic flow regimes at contaminated sites support the prospect of developing effective, cost-conscious cleanup strategies in the future.« less

Authors:
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
University of Kansas, Lawrence, Kansas (US)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Environmental Management (EM) (US)
OSTI Identifier:
828642
Report Number(s):
EMSP-60199-2000
R&D Project: EMSP 60199; TRN: US200427%%552
DOE Contract Number:  
FG07-97ER14826
Resource Type:
Technical Report
Resource Relation:
Other Information: PBD: 1 Jun 2000
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
54 ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES; 58 GEOSCIENCES; COMPUTERS; CONES; DIMENSIONS; FLUID FLOW; PUMPING; RADAR; REFLECTION; SITE CHARACTERIZATION; WATER TABLES

Citation Formats

Steeples, Don W. Reflection and Ground Penetrating Radar for Environmental Site Characterization. United States: N. p., 2000. Web. doi:10.2172/828642.
Steeples, Don W. Reflection and Ground Penetrating Radar for Environmental Site Characterization. United States. doi:10.2172/828642.
Steeples, Don W. Thu . "Reflection and Ground Penetrating Radar for Environmental Site Characterization". United States. doi:10.2172/828642. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/828642.
@article{osti_828642,
title = {Reflection and Ground Penetrating Radar for Environmental Site Characterization},
author = {Steeples, Don W},
abstractNote = {(1) To examine the complementary site-characterization capabilities of modern, three-component shallow seismic reflection (SSR) techniques and ground-penetrating radar (GPR) methods at depths ranging from 2 to 8 m at an existing test site; (2) To demonstrate the usefulness of the two methods when used in concert to characterize, in three dimensions, the cone of depression of a pumping well that will serve as a proxy site for fluid-flow at an actual, polluted site; (3) To use the site as an outdoor mesoscale laboratory to validate existing three-dimensional ground-penetrating radar and seismic-reflection computer models developed at the University of Kansas. To do this, seismic and GPR data are being collected along the same line(s) and within the same depth range. The principal investigators selected a site in central Kansas as a primary location. Although the site itself is not environmentally sensitive, the area offers attributes that are particularly useful for this research and allow the site to serve as a proxy for areas that are contaminated. As part of an effort to evaluate the strengths of each method, the seismic and GPR surveys have been repeated on a seasonal basis to establish how the complementary information obtained varies over time. Because the water table fluctuates seasonally at this site, variations in the two types of data over time also can be observed. Such noninvasive, in-situ methods of identifying and characterizing the hydrologic flow regimes at contaminated sites support the prospect of developing effective, cost-conscious cleanup strategies in the future.},
doi = {10.2172/828642},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {2000},
month = {6}
}

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