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Title: LESSONS LEARNED FROM PREVIOUS WASTE STORAGE TANK VAPOR CONTROL ATTEMPTS ON SINGLE SHELL TANK (SST) & DOUBLE SHELL TANK (DST) FARMS

Abstract

This report forms the basis for a feasibility study and conceptual design to control vapor emissions from waste storage tanks at the Hanford Site. The Carbtrol, Vapor Mixing, and High Efficiency Gas Absorber (HEGA) vapor controls were evaluated to determine the lessons learned from previous failed vapor control attempts. This document illustrates the resulting findings based on that evaluation.

Authors:
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
CH2M (US)
Sponsoring Org.:
ENVIRONMENTAL MANAGEMENT (US)
OSTI Identifier:
828472
Report Number(s):
RPP-22171, Rev.0
DE-AC27-99RL14047; TRN: US0403956
DOE Contract Number:
AC27-99RL14047
Resource Type:
Conference
Resource Relation:
Conference: Conference title not supplied, Conference location not supplied, Conference dates not supplied; Other Information: PBD: 3 Aug 2004
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
12 MANAGEMENT OF RADIOACTIVE WASTES, AND NON-RADIOACTIVE WASTES FROM NUCLEAR FACILITIES; DESIGN; RADIOACTIVE WASTE STORAGE; STORAGE FACILITIES; VAPORS; AIR POLLUTION CONTROL; HANFORD RESERVATION

Citation Formats

BAKER, D.M. LESSONS LEARNED FROM PREVIOUS WASTE STORAGE TANK VAPOR CONTROL ATTEMPTS ON SINGLE SHELL TANK (SST) & DOUBLE SHELL TANK (DST) FARMS. United States: N. p., 2004. Web.
BAKER, D.M. LESSONS LEARNED FROM PREVIOUS WASTE STORAGE TANK VAPOR CONTROL ATTEMPTS ON SINGLE SHELL TANK (SST) & DOUBLE SHELL TANK (DST) FARMS. United States.
BAKER, D.M. 2004. "LESSONS LEARNED FROM PREVIOUS WASTE STORAGE TANK VAPOR CONTROL ATTEMPTS ON SINGLE SHELL TANK (SST) & DOUBLE SHELL TANK (DST) FARMS". United States. doi:. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/828472.
@article{osti_828472,
title = {LESSONS LEARNED FROM PREVIOUS WASTE STORAGE TANK VAPOR CONTROL ATTEMPTS ON SINGLE SHELL TANK (SST) & DOUBLE SHELL TANK (DST) FARMS},
author = {BAKER, D.M.},
abstractNote = {This report forms the basis for a feasibility study and conceptual design to control vapor emissions from waste storage tanks at the Hanford Site. The Carbtrol, Vapor Mixing, and High Efficiency Gas Absorber (HEGA) vapor controls were evaluated to determine the lessons learned from previous failed vapor control attempts. This document illustrates the resulting findings based on that evaluation.},
doi = {},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = 2004,
month = 8
}

Conference:
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  • This report is an evaluation of Best Available Control Technology for Toxics (tBACT) for installation and operation of the Hanford double shell (DST) tank primary ventilation systems. The DST primary ventilation systems are being modified to support Hanford's waste retrieval, mixing, and delivery of single shell tank (SST) and DST waste through the DST storage system to the Waste Treatment and Immobilizaiton Plant (WTP).
  • This report is an evaluation of Best Available Control Technology for Toxics (tBACT) for installation and operation of the Hanford double shell (DST) tank primary ventilation systems. The DST primary ventilation systems are being modified to support Hanford's waste retrieval, mixing, and delivery of single shell tank (SST) and DST waste throught the DST storage system to the Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP).
  • The purpose of this paper is to discuss major activities and lessons learned from remediation of the V-tank waste at Idaho National Laboratory's (INL's) Test Area North (TAN) complex. Remediation activities involved the on-site treatment, solidification and disposal of over 61,000 L (16,000 gal) of radioactively hazardous V-tank waste. In July, 2006, over 98% of the V-tank waste was disposed of at the Idaho CERCLA Disposal Facility (ICDF). Disposal was accomplished using the three 38,000-L (10,000-gal) V-tanks that had stored most of the V-tank waste for over 30 years. Included in V-Tank remediation was the removal of approximately 7,650 m{supmore » 3} (10,000 yd{sup 3}) of contaminated soil. Plans are to treat the remaining V-tank waste off-site in early 2007, with the treated residual also disposed of at the ICDF. Disposal of the treated V-tank waste at ICDF marked a major step in completing remediation of the TAN V-tanks, a task begun in 1999 when the original Record of Decision (ROD) was published. Over this time, there have been a number of stops and starts associated with remediating this waste. Although many of these stops and starts were unavoidable, there are a number of lessons learned for the V-tank remediation that could help prevent unnecessary expenses and schedule delays in future remediation activities within the Department of Energy (DOE) complex. This paper identifies major and minor lessons learned from V-tank waste remediation efforts - those that resulted in unnecessary delays/expenses, as well as those areas that accelerated V-tank remediation efforts. (authors)« less
  • The safety of radioactive waste disposal facilities and the decommissioning of complex sites may be predicated on the performance of engineered and natural barriers. For assessing the safety of a waste disposal facility or a decommissioned site, a performance assessment or similar analysis is often completed. The analysis is typically based on a site conceptual model that is developed from site characterization information, observations, and, in many cases, expert judgment. Because waste disposal facilities are sited, constructed, monitored, and maintained, a fair amount of data has been generated at a variety of sites in a variety of natural systems. Thismore » paper provides select examples of lessons learned from the observations developed from the monitoring of various radioactive waste facilities (storage and disposal), and discusses the implications for modeling of future waste disposal facilities that are yet to be constructed or for the development of dose assessments for the release of decommissioning sites. Monitoring has been and continues to be performed at a variety of different facilities for the disposal of radioactive waste. These include facilities for the disposal of commercial low-level waste (LLW), reprocessing wastes, and uranium mill tailings. Many of the lessons learned and problems encountered provide a unique opportunity to improve future designs of waste disposal facilities, to improve dose modeling for decommissioning sites, and to be proactive in identifying future problems. Typically, an initial conceptual model was developed and the siting and design of the disposal facility was based on the conceptual model. After facility construction and operation, monitoring data was collected and evaluated. In many cases the monitoring data did not comport with the original site conceptual model, leading to additional investigation and changes to the site conceptual model and modifications to the design of the facility. The following cases are discussed: commercial LLW disposal facilities; uranium mill tailings disposal facilities; and reprocessing waste storage and disposal facilities. The observations developed from the monitoring and maintenance of waste disposal and storage facilities provide valuable lessons learned for the design and modeling of future waste disposal facilities and the decommissioning of complex sites.« less
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