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Title: Managing Tight Binding Receptors for New Separations Technologies

Abstract

This program is directed at establishing the fundamental principles that will make the most strongly binding ligands and their complexes available to separations technologies.The ultimate powerful ligands can capture metal ions in the most competitive of circumstances. Ultra tight-binding ligands can remove metal ions from mineralized sites, take them away from lesser ligands, and even capture metal ions from extremely dilute solutions. Further, these feats offer the possibility of solving some of the most serious environmental challenges that cannot be met by existing technologies: decontamination of metal surfaces, removal of metal contaminations from soils, separation of very low concentrations of radioactive metal ions from nuclear waste, capturing of contaminating metal ions from extremely dilute solutions. Despite their promise, extremely stable complexes are rarely used in separations because their great stabilities are accompanied by very slow rates of complex formation and dissociation. Specifically, this program has attacked this limitation in two ways: (1) seeking ba sic scientific ways of overcoming the natural molecular lethargy of ultra tight-binding ligands and (2) developing a new technology that functions despite the slowness of the metal binding reactions. The three basic concept areas of this program are: replace slow equilibrium formation and dissociation of ultramore » tight-binding complexes by (1) switch-binding of templating ligands, and (2) switch-release of photo reactive ligands, and (3) Create a slow separations technology based on imprinted polymers (e.g., a soil poultice).« less

Authors:
;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
University of Kansas, Lawrence, Kansas (US)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Environmental Management (EM) (US)
OSTI Identifier:
827189
Report Number(s):
EMSP-54791-2000
R&D Project: EMSP 54791; TRN: US0403221
DOE Contract Number:  
FG07-96ER14708
Resource Type:
Technical Report
Resource Relation:
Other Information: PBD: 1 Jun 2000
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
12 MANAGEMENT OF RADIOACTIVE WASTES, AND NON-RADIOACTIVE WASTES FROM NUCLEAR FACILITIES; 54 ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES; 37 INORGANIC, ORGANIC, PHYSICAL AND ANALYTICAL CHEMISTRY; DECONTAMINATION; DISSOCIATION; POLYMERS; RADIOACTIVE WASTES; REMOVAL; SOILS

Citation Formats

Busch, Daryl H, and Givens, Richard S. Managing Tight Binding Receptors for New Separations Technologies. United States: N. p., 2000. Web. doi:10.2172/827189.
Busch, Daryl H, & Givens, Richard S. Managing Tight Binding Receptors for New Separations Technologies. United States. doi:10.2172/827189.
Busch, Daryl H, and Givens, Richard S. Thu . "Managing Tight Binding Receptors for New Separations Technologies". United States. doi:10.2172/827189. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/827189.
@article{osti_827189,
title = {Managing Tight Binding Receptors for New Separations Technologies},
author = {Busch, Daryl H and Givens, Richard S},
abstractNote = {This program is directed at establishing the fundamental principles that will make the most strongly binding ligands and their complexes available to separations technologies.The ultimate powerful ligands can capture metal ions in the most competitive of circumstances. Ultra tight-binding ligands can remove metal ions from mineralized sites, take them away from lesser ligands, and even capture metal ions from extremely dilute solutions. Further, these feats offer the possibility of solving some of the most serious environmental challenges that cannot be met by existing technologies: decontamination of metal surfaces, removal of metal contaminations from soils, separation of very low concentrations of radioactive metal ions from nuclear waste, capturing of contaminating metal ions from extremely dilute solutions. Despite their promise, extremely stable complexes are rarely used in separations because their great stabilities are accompanied by very slow rates of complex formation and dissociation. Specifically, this program has attacked this limitation in two ways: (1) seeking ba sic scientific ways of overcoming the natural molecular lethargy of ultra tight-binding ligands and (2) developing a new technology that functions despite the slowness of the metal binding reactions. The three basic concept areas of this program are: replace slow equilibrium formation and dissociation of ultra tight-binding complexes by (1) switch-binding of templating ligands, and (2) switch-release of photo reactive ligands, and (3) Create a slow separations technology based on imprinted polymers (e.g., a soil poultice).},
doi = {10.2172/827189},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {2000},
month = {6}
}

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