skip to main content
OSTI.GOV title logo U.S. Department of Energy
Office of Scientific and Technical Information

Title: New Anion-Exchange Resins for Improved Separations of Nuclear Material

Abstract

We are developing bifunctional anion-exchange resins that facilitate anion uptake by carefully controlling the structure of the anion receptor site. Our new ion-exchange resins interface the rapidly developing field of ion-specific chelating ligands with robust, commercial ion-exchange technology. The basic scientific issues addressed are actinide complex speciation along with modeling of the metal complex/functional site interactions in order to determine optimal binding site characteristics. Resin materials that actively facilitate the uptake of actinide complexes from solution should display both improved selectivity and kinetic properties. Our implementation of the 'bifunctionality concept' involves N-derivatization of pyridinium units from a base poly(4- vinylpyridine) resin (PVP) with a second cationic site, such that the two anion-exchange sites are linked by 'spacer' arms of varying length and flexibility. The overall objective of our research is to develop a predictive capability that allows the facile design and implementation of multi-functionalized anion-exchange materials to selectively sorb metal complexes of interest from targeted process, waste, and environmental streams. Various Focus Areas and Crosscutting Programs have described needs that would be favorably impacted by the new materials:Tanks, Plutonium; Subsurface Contaminants; Mixed Waste; and Efficient Separations. Sites within the DOE complex which would benefit from the improved anion exchange technologymore » include Hanford, Idaho, Los Alamos, Oak Ridge, and Savannah River.« less

Authors:
; ;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Los Alamos National Lab., NM; Texas Tech University, Lubbock TX (US)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Environmental Management (EM) (US)
OSTI Identifier:
827177
Report Number(s):
EMSP-54770-2000
R&D Project: EMSP 54770; TRN: US200425%%452
DOE Contract Number:  
FG07-97ER14765
Resource Type:
Technical Report
Resource Relation:
Other Information: PBD: 1 Jun 2000
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
37 INORGANIC, ORGANIC, PHYSICAL AND ANALYTICAL CHEMISTRY; 54 ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES; ACTINIDE COMPLEXES; ACTINIDES; ANIONS; DESIGN; FLEXIBILITY; IMPLEMENTATION; ION EXCHANGE; KINETICS; PLUTONIUM; RESINS; SIMULATION

Citation Formats

Barr, Mary E, Bartsch, Richard A, and Jarvinen, Gordon D. New Anion-Exchange Resins for Improved Separations of Nuclear Material. United States: N. p., 2000. Web. doi:10.2172/827177.
Barr, Mary E, Bartsch, Richard A, & Jarvinen, Gordon D. New Anion-Exchange Resins for Improved Separations of Nuclear Material. United States. doi:10.2172/827177.
Barr, Mary E, Bartsch, Richard A, and Jarvinen, Gordon D. Thu . "New Anion-Exchange Resins for Improved Separations of Nuclear Material". United States. doi:10.2172/827177. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/827177.
@article{osti_827177,
title = {New Anion-Exchange Resins for Improved Separations of Nuclear Material},
author = {Barr, Mary E and Bartsch, Richard A and Jarvinen, Gordon D},
abstractNote = {We are developing bifunctional anion-exchange resins that facilitate anion uptake by carefully controlling the structure of the anion receptor site. Our new ion-exchange resins interface the rapidly developing field of ion-specific chelating ligands with robust, commercial ion-exchange technology. The basic scientific issues addressed are actinide complex speciation along with modeling of the metal complex/functional site interactions in order to determine optimal binding site characteristics. Resin materials that actively facilitate the uptake of actinide complexes from solution should display both improved selectivity and kinetic properties. Our implementation of the 'bifunctionality concept' involves N-derivatization of pyridinium units from a base poly(4- vinylpyridine) resin (PVP) with a second cationic site, such that the two anion-exchange sites are linked by 'spacer' arms of varying length and flexibility. The overall objective of our research is to develop a predictive capability that allows the facile design and implementation of multi-functionalized anion-exchange materials to selectively sorb metal complexes of interest from targeted process, waste, and environmental streams. Various Focus Areas and Crosscutting Programs have described needs that would be favorably impacted by the new materials:Tanks, Plutonium; Subsurface Contaminants; Mixed Waste; and Efficient Separations. Sites within the DOE complex which would benefit from the improved anion exchange technology include Hanford, Idaho, Los Alamos, Oak Ridge, and Savannah River.},
doi = {10.2172/827177},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {2000},
month = {6}
}

Technical Report:

Save / Share: