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Title: Review of Current Nuclear Vacuum System Technologies

Abstract

Nearly all industrial operations generate unwanted dust, particulate matter, and/or liquid wastes. Waste dust and particulates can be readily tracked to other work locations, and airborne particulates can be spread through ventilation systems to all locations within a building, and even vented outside the building - a serious concern for processes involving hazardous, radioactive, or nuclear materials. Several varieties of vacuum systems have been proposed and/or are commercially available for clean up of both solid and liquid hazardous and nuclear materials. A review of current technologies highlights both the advantages and disadvantages of the various systems, and demonstrates the need for a system designed to address issues specific to hazardous and nuclear material cleanup. A review of previous and current hazardous/nuclear material cleanup technologies is presented. From simple conventional vacuums modified for use in industrial operations, to systems specifically engineered for such purposes, the advantages and disadvantages are examined in light of the following criteria: minimal worker exposure; minimal secondary waste generation;reduced equipment maintenance and consumable parts; simplicity of design, yet fully compatible with all waste types; and ease of use. The work effort reviews past, existing and proposed technologies in light of such considerations. Accomplishments of selected systems aremore » presented, including identified areas where technological improvements could be suggested.« less

Authors:
; ;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Inventure Laboratories, Inc., Knoxville, TN (US)
Sponsoring Org.:
none (US)
OSTI Identifier:
826320
Resource Type:
Conference
Resource Relation:
Conference: Waste Management 2003 Symposium, Tucson, AZ (US), 02/23/2003--02/27/2003; Other Information: PBD: 25 Feb 2003
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
12 MANAGEMENT OF RADIOACTIVE WASTES, AND NON-RADIOACTIVE WASTES FROM NUCLEAR FACILITIES; 46 INSTRUMENTATION RELATED TO NUCLEAR SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY; DESIGN; DUSTS; LIQUID WASTES; MAINTENANCE; PARTICULATES; VACUUM SYSTEMS; VENTILATION SYSTEMS; WASTE MANAGEMENT; WASTES

Citation Formats

Carroll, M, McCracken, J, and Shope, T. Review of Current Nuclear Vacuum System Technologies. United States: N. p., 2003. Web.
Carroll, M, McCracken, J, & Shope, T. Review of Current Nuclear Vacuum System Technologies. United States.
Carroll, M, McCracken, J, and Shope, T. Tue . "Review of Current Nuclear Vacuum System Technologies". United States. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/826320.
@article{osti_826320,
title = {Review of Current Nuclear Vacuum System Technologies},
author = {Carroll, M and McCracken, J and Shope, T},
abstractNote = {Nearly all industrial operations generate unwanted dust, particulate matter, and/or liquid wastes. Waste dust and particulates can be readily tracked to other work locations, and airborne particulates can be spread through ventilation systems to all locations within a building, and even vented outside the building - a serious concern for processes involving hazardous, radioactive, or nuclear materials. Several varieties of vacuum systems have been proposed and/or are commercially available for clean up of both solid and liquid hazardous and nuclear materials. A review of current technologies highlights both the advantages and disadvantages of the various systems, and demonstrates the need for a system designed to address issues specific to hazardous and nuclear material cleanup. A review of previous and current hazardous/nuclear material cleanup technologies is presented. From simple conventional vacuums modified for use in industrial operations, to systems specifically engineered for such purposes, the advantages and disadvantages are examined in light of the following criteria: minimal worker exposure; minimal secondary waste generation;reduced equipment maintenance and consumable parts; simplicity of design, yet fully compatible with all waste types; and ease of use. The work effort reviews past, existing and proposed technologies in light of such considerations. Accomplishments of selected systems are presented, including identified areas where technological improvements could be suggested.},
doi = {},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {2003},
month = {2}
}

Conference:
Other availability
Please see Document Availability for additional information on obtaining the full-text document. Library patrons may search WorldCat to identify libraries that hold this conference proceeding.

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