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Title: DECONTAMINATION TECHNOLOGIES FOR FACILITY REUSE

Abstract

As nuclear research and production facilities across the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) nuclear weapons complex are slated for deactivation and decommissioning (D&D), there is a need to decontaminate some facilities for reuse for another mission or continued use for the same mission. Improved technologies available in the commercial sector and tested by the DOE can help solve the DOE's decontamination problems. Decontamination technologies include mechanical methods, such as shaving, scabbling, and blasting; application of chemicals; biological methods; and electrochemical techniques. Materials to be decontaminated are primarily concrete or metal. Concrete materials include walls, floors, ceilings, bio-shields, and fuel pools. Metallic materials include structural steel, valves, pipes, gloveboxes, reactors, and other equipment. Porous materials such as concrete can be contaminated throughout their structure, although contamination in concrete normally resides in the top quarter-inch below the surface. Metals are normally only contaminated on the surface. Contamination includes a variety of alpha, beta, and gamma-emitting radionuclides and can sometimes include heavy metals and organic contamination regulated by the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA). This paper describes several advanced mechanical, chemical, and other methods to decontaminate structures, equipment, and materials.

Authors:
;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
U.S. Department of Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory, P.O. Box 880, Morgantown, West Virginia 26507-0880; Science Applications International Corporation, P.O. Box 4194, Star City, West Virginia 26504 (US)
Sponsoring Org.:
US Department of Energy (US)
OSTI Identifier:
826198
Resource Type:
Conference
Resource Relation:
Conference: Waste Management 2003 Symposium, Tucson, AZ (US), 02/23/2003--02/27/2003; Other Information: PBD: 27 Feb 2003
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
11 NUCLEAR FUEL CYCLE AND FUEL MATERIALS; 12 MANAGEMENT OF RADIOACTIVE WASTES, AND NON-RADIOACTIVE WASTES FROM NUCLEAR FACILITIES; 45 MILITARY TECHNOLOGY, WEAPONRY, AND NATIONAL DEFENSE; COMMERCIAL SECTOR; CONCRETES; CONTAMINATION; DEACTIVATION; DECOMMISSIONING; DECONTAMINATION; EXPLOSIVE FRACTURING; FUEL STORAGE POOLS; GLOVEBOXES; NUCLEAR WEAPONS; POROUS MATERIALS; RADIOISOTOPES; RESOURCE CONSERVATION; VALVES; WASTE MANAGEMENT

Citation Formats

Bossart, Steven J., and Blair, Danielle M. DECONTAMINATION TECHNOLOGIES FOR FACILITY REUSE. United States: N. p., 2003. Web.
Bossart, Steven J., & Blair, Danielle M. DECONTAMINATION TECHNOLOGIES FOR FACILITY REUSE. United States.
Bossart, Steven J., and Blair, Danielle M. Thu . "DECONTAMINATION TECHNOLOGIES FOR FACILITY REUSE". United States. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/826198.
@article{osti_826198,
title = {DECONTAMINATION TECHNOLOGIES FOR FACILITY REUSE},
author = {Bossart, Steven J. and Blair, Danielle M.},
abstractNote = {As nuclear research and production facilities across the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) nuclear weapons complex are slated for deactivation and decommissioning (D&D), there is a need to decontaminate some facilities for reuse for another mission or continued use for the same mission. Improved technologies available in the commercial sector and tested by the DOE can help solve the DOE's decontamination problems. Decontamination technologies include mechanical methods, such as shaving, scabbling, and blasting; application of chemicals; biological methods; and electrochemical techniques. Materials to be decontaminated are primarily concrete or metal. Concrete materials include walls, floors, ceilings, bio-shields, and fuel pools. Metallic materials include structural steel, valves, pipes, gloveboxes, reactors, and other equipment. Porous materials such as concrete can be contaminated throughout their structure, although contamination in concrete normally resides in the top quarter-inch below the surface. Metals are normally only contaminated on the surface. Contamination includes a variety of alpha, beta, and gamma-emitting radionuclides and can sometimes include heavy metals and organic contamination regulated by the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA). This paper describes several advanced mechanical, chemical, and other methods to decontaminate structures, equipment, and materials.},
doi = {},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {Thu Feb 27 00:00:00 EST 2003},
month = {Thu Feb 27 00:00:00 EST 2003}
}

Conference:
Other availability
Please see Document Availability for additional information on obtaining the full-text document. Library patrons may search WorldCat to identify libraries that hold this conference proceeding.

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