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Title: Waste Form Qualification Experience at the West Valley Demonstration Project

Abstract

Since 1996, the West Valley Demonstration Project (WVDP) has operated a slurry-fed ceramic melter to vitrify high-level nuclear waste (HLW) for the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). More than 65 batches of HLW were mixed with glass-forming chemicals between June 1996 and August 2002 to make a ''qualified'' HLW form. The nuances of this procedure and the lessons learned from the application of the process will be provided in this paper to guide future producers of immobilized HLW.

Authors:
;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
West Valley Nuclear Services Co.; U.S. Department of Energy, West Valley Demonstration Project (US)
Sponsoring Org.:
US Department of Energy (US)
OSTI Identifier:
825627
Resource Type:
Conference
Resource Relation:
Conference: Waste Management 2003 Symposium, Tucson, AZ (US), 02/23/2003--02/27/2003; Other Information: PBD: 24 Feb 2003
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
12 MANAGEMENT OF RADIOACTIVE WASTES, AND NON-RADIOACTIVE WASTES FROM NUCLEAR FACILITIES; CERAMIC MELTERS; RADIOACTIVE WASTES; WASTE FORMS; WASTE MANAGEMENT

Citation Formats

Palmer, R.A., and Misercola, A.J. Waste Form Qualification Experience at the West Valley Demonstration Project. United States: N. p., 2003. Web.
Palmer, R.A., & Misercola, A.J. Waste Form Qualification Experience at the West Valley Demonstration Project. United States.
Palmer, R.A., and Misercola, A.J. Mon . "Waste Form Qualification Experience at the West Valley Demonstration Project". United States. doi:. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/825627.
@article{osti_825627,
title = {Waste Form Qualification Experience at the West Valley Demonstration Project},
author = {Palmer, R.A. and Misercola, A.J.},
abstractNote = {Since 1996, the West Valley Demonstration Project (WVDP) has operated a slurry-fed ceramic melter to vitrify high-level nuclear waste (HLW) for the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). More than 65 batches of HLW were mixed with glass-forming chemicals between June 1996 and August 2002 to make a ''qualified'' HLW form. The nuances of this procedure and the lessons learned from the application of the process will be provided in this paper to guide future producers of immobilized HLW.},
doi = {},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {Mon Feb 24 00:00:00 EST 2003},
month = {Mon Feb 24 00:00:00 EST 2003}
}

Conference:
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  • This report provides a summary of work performed to develop a cement-based, low-level waste formulation suitable for the solidification of decontaminated high-level waste liquid produced as a by-product of PUREX spent fuel reprocessing. The resultant waste form is suitable for interim storage and is intended for ultimate disposal as low-level Class C waste; it also meets the stability requirements of the NRC Branch Technical Position on Waste Form Qualification, May 1983 and the requirements of 10 CFR 61. A recipe was developed utilizing only Portland Type I cement based on an inorganic salts simulant of the PUREX supernatant. The qualifiedmore » recipe was tested full scale in the production facility and was observed to produce a product with entrained air, low density, and lower-than-expected compressive strength. Further laboratory scale testing with actual decontaminated supernatant revealed that set retarders were present in the supernatant, precluding setting of the product and allowing the production of ''bleed water.'' Calcium nitrate and sodium silicate were added to overcome the set retarding effect and produced a final product with improved performance when compared to the original formulation. This report describes the qualification process and qualification test results for the final product formulation. 7 refs., 38 figs., 21 tabs.« less
  • This paper presents detailed results and lessons learned from the very challenging and highly successful 2005 low level radioactive waste sorting, packaging, and shipping campaign that removed over 95% of the available inventory of 350,000 ft{sup 3} of legacy low level waste at the West Valley Demonstration Project near West Valley, New York. First some programmatic perspective and site history is provided to provide pertinent context for DOE's waste disposal mandates at the site. This is followed by a detailed description of the waste types, the storage locations, the containers, and the varied sorting and packaging facilities used to accomplishmore » the campaign. The overall sorting and packaging protocols for this inventory of wastes are defined. This is followed by detailed sorting data and results concluding with lessons learned. (authors)« less
  • The West Valley Nuclear Fuel Reprocessing Plant was constructed in 1966. Operations were stopped in 1972 after reprocessing 640 Mg (700 tons) of spent fuel. About 560,000 gallons of high-level radioactive liquid wastes from the Purex Process and 8,000 gallons of fuel containing thorium from the THOREX process were stored in underground steel tanks. The DOE contracted with West Valley Nuclear Services to operate the West Valley Demonstration Project for the processing of the radioactive wastes into a borosilicate waste form. This report provides a process overview and status report.
  • This report provides a summary of operational experiences, component and system performance, and lessons learned associated with the operation of the Vitrification Facility (VF) at the West Valley Demonstration Project (WVDP). The VF was designed to convert stored high-level radioactive waste (HLW) into a stable waste form (borosilicate glass) suitable for disposal in a federal repository. Following successful completion on nonradioactive test, HLW processing began in July 1995. Completion of Phase 1 of HLW processing was reached on 10 June 1998 and represented the processing of 9.32 million curies of cesium-137 (Cs-137) and strontium-90 (Sr-90) to fill 211 canisters withmore » over 436,000 kilograms of glass. With approximately 85% of the total estimated curie content removed from underground waste storage tanks during Phase 1, subsequent operations will focus on removal of tank heel wastes.« less
  • This document provides information on the West Valley Demonstration Project (WVDP) reference HLW form and canister. The WVDP will solidify the liquid HLW remaining at the commercial nuclear fuel reprocessing plant at West Valley, New York. The reference waste form is borosilicate glass with a zeolite loading of 10 wt % and a waste sludge loading of 23 wt %. The glass formers that will be added to the waste during vitrification include Si, Al, B, and Na. Twenty-eight day and longer term leach tests show that the glass has adequate leach resistance. The room temperature density of the glassmore » is 2.7 g/cm/sup 3/. Glass viscosity is 100 poise at 1049/sup 0/C. Upper and lower linear expansion coefficients are 99.02 x 10/sup -6///sup 0/C and 10.76 x 10/sup -6///sup 0/C, respectively. The glass transition temperature is about 470/sup 0/C. The reference canister will be fabricated from stainless steel 304. The length will be 300 cm, and the diameter will be 61 cm. The canister wall will be sheet with a minimum thickness of 0.34 cm. The bottom will be a flanged and reverse dished head with a thickness of 0.48 cm; the top will be an ASME flanged and dished head. The lifting flange will be fabricated from square bar. Each canister will be uniquely labeled on the shoulder and side of the canister. The maximum gamma dose rate of an average canistered waste form at time of production is expected to be 8500 R/h. Canistered waste standing in 25/sup 0/C air will have a centerline temperature of less than 45/sup 0/C. The weight of a 100% full glass filled canister will be 2480 kg. 9 refs., 8 figs., 23 tabs.« less