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Title: Nanomaterials in Secondary Battery Development

Abstract

This granted funded research into the application of nanoscience to Li-ion batteries. Different synthesis strategies were employed to create a nanofiber electrode (based on tin-oxide) and a honeycomb electrode (carbon). In both cases, we showed that the nanostructured material was capable of delivering dramatically increased specific capacity (mAh/g) upon discharge when compared to conventional film electrodes. This ability is due to the decreased solid-state diffusion distance of the Li-ion in the nanostructured electrodes. The nanofiber-SnO{sub 2} electrode was created by the template synthesis method. Briefly, a precursor solution impregnates the monodisperse nanoscopic pores of a sacrificial template membrane. The pores run the membrane's entire length. The precursor solution is then processed to the desired material, here using sol-gel chemistry, and the template is removed. This leaves nanostructures of the desired product intact and extending from a substrate like the bristles of a brush. This research topic combines this nanofabrication technique with the Sn-based anode. Tin-oxide based composites have shown great promise as an alternative material for Li-ion battery anodes. This material is electrochemically converted to composite Sn/LiO{sub 2} electrodes. In this form, they are theoretically capable of storing twice the amount of Li as carbon, the current commercial anode. Wemore » showed important improvements in rate-capabilities and cycle-life of this Sn-based nanoscale electrode compared to a thin-film electrode of the same material. Rate-capabilities are a measurement of the specific capacity able to be delivered at increasing discharge rates (1C = 1/h). Figure 1 compares the rate capabilities of the nanostructured electrode to that of the film control electrode. This report shows the nanostructured material was capable of delivering dramatically increased specific capacity (mAh/g) upon discharge when compared to conventional film electrodes.« less

Authors:
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
University of Florida, Gainesville, FL (US)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Energy Research (ER) (US)
OSTI Identifier:
824764
Report Number(s):
DOE/ER/14958-1
TRN: US200503%%709
DOE Contract Number:  
FG02-99ER14958
Resource Type:
Technical Report
Resource Relation:
Other Information: PBD: 15 Sep 1999
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
25 ENERGY STORAGE; CARBON; DIFFUSION; ELECTRODES; NANOSTRUCTURES; PRECURSOR; SUBSTRATES; SYNTHESIS; METAL-NONMETAL BATTERIES; LITHIUM; TIN OXIDES; PERFORMANCE

Citation Formats

Martin, C. R. Nanomaterials in Secondary Battery Development. United States: N. p., 1999. Web. doi:10.2172/824764.
Martin, C. R. Nanomaterials in Secondary Battery Development. United States. doi:10.2172/824764.
Martin, C. R. Wed . "Nanomaterials in Secondary Battery Development". United States. doi:10.2172/824764. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/824764.
@article{osti_824764,
title = {Nanomaterials in Secondary Battery Development},
author = {Martin, C. R.},
abstractNote = {This granted funded research into the application of nanoscience to Li-ion batteries. Different synthesis strategies were employed to create a nanofiber electrode (based on tin-oxide) and a honeycomb electrode (carbon). In both cases, we showed that the nanostructured material was capable of delivering dramatically increased specific capacity (mAh/g) upon discharge when compared to conventional film electrodes. This ability is due to the decreased solid-state diffusion distance of the Li-ion in the nanostructured electrodes. The nanofiber-SnO{sub 2} electrode was created by the template synthesis method. Briefly, a precursor solution impregnates the monodisperse nanoscopic pores of a sacrificial template membrane. The pores run the membrane's entire length. The precursor solution is then processed to the desired material, here using sol-gel chemistry, and the template is removed. This leaves nanostructures of the desired product intact and extending from a substrate like the bristles of a brush. This research topic combines this nanofabrication technique with the Sn-based anode. Tin-oxide based composites have shown great promise as an alternative material for Li-ion battery anodes. This material is electrochemically converted to composite Sn/LiO{sub 2} electrodes. In this form, they are theoretically capable of storing twice the amount of Li as carbon, the current commercial anode. We showed important improvements in rate-capabilities and cycle-life of this Sn-based nanoscale electrode compared to a thin-film electrode of the same material. Rate-capabilities are a measurement of the specific capacity able to be delivered at increasing discharge rates (1C = 1/h). Figure 1 compares the rate capabilities of the nanostructured electrode to that of the film control electrode. This report shows the nanostructured material was capable of delivering dramatically increased specific capacity (mAh/g) upon discharge when compared to conventional film electrodes.},
doi = {10.2172/824764},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {1999},
month = {9}
}