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Title: Avian Collisions with Wind Turbines: A Summary of Existing Studies and Comparisons to Other Sources of Avian Collision Mortality in the United States

Abstract

It has been estimated that from 100 million to well over 1 billion birds are killed annually in the United States due to collisions with human-made structures, including vehicles, buildings and windows, powerlines, communication towers, and wind turbines. Although wind energy is generally considered environmentally friendly (because it generates electricity without emitting air pollutants or greenhouse gases), the potential for avian fatalities has delayed and even significantly contributed to blocking the development of some windplants in the U.S. Given the importance of developing a viable renewable source of energy, the objective of this paper is to put the issue of avian mortality associated with windpower into perspective with other sources of avian collision mortality across the U.S. The purpose of this paper is to provide a detailed summary of the mortality data collected at windplants and put avian collision mortality associated with windpower development into perspective with other significant sources of avian collision mortality across the United States. We provide a summary of data collected at many of the U.S. windplants and provide annual bird fatality estimates and projections for all wind turbines in the U.S. For comparison, we also review studies of avian collision mortality from other major human-mademore » structures and report annual bird fatality estimates for these sources. Other sources also significantly contribute to overall avian mortality. For example, the National Audubon Society estimates avian mortality due to house cats at 100 million birds per year. Pesticide use, oil spills, disease, etc., are other significant sources of unintended avian mortality. Due to funding constraints, the scope of this paper is limited to examining only avian mortality resulting from collisions with human-made obstacles.« less

Authors:
; ; ; ; ;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Western EcoSystems Technology, Inc., Cheyenne, WY (United States); RESOLVE, Inc., Washington, DC (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EE) (US); National Wind Energy Coordinating Committee
OSTI Identifier:
822418
Report Number(s):
DOE-00SF22100-
TRN: US200414%%106
DOE Contract Number:  
FG03-00SF22100
Resource Type:
Technical Report
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
17 WIND ENERGY; 54 ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES; AIR; BIRDS; COMMUNICATIONS; ELECTRICITY; GASES; GREENHOUSE GASES; MORTALITY; OIL SPILLS; PESTICIDES; POLLUTANTS; WIND TURBINES; WINDOWS

Citation Formats

Erickson, Wallace P., Johnson, Gregory D., Strickland, Dale M., Young, Jr., David P., Sernka, Karyn J., and Good, Rhett E. Avian Collisions with Wind Turbines: A Summary of Existing Studies and Comparisons to Other Sources of Avian Collision Mortality in the United States. United States: N. p., 2001. Web. doi:10.2172/822418.
Erickson, Wallace P., Johnson, Gregory D., Strickland, Dale M., Young, Jr., David P., Sernka, Karyn J., & Good, Rhett E. Avian Collisions with Wind Turbines: A Summary of Existing Studies and Comparisons to Other Sources of Avian Collision Mortality in the United States. United States. doi:10.2172/822418.
Erickson, Wallace P., Johnson, Gregory D., Strickland, Dale M., Young, Jr., David P., Sernka, Karyn J., and Good, Rhett E. Wed . "Avian Collisions with Wind Turbines: A Summary of Existing Studies and Comparisons to Other Sources of Avian Collision Mortality in the United States". United States. doi:10.2172/822418. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/822418.
@article{osti_822418,
title = {Avian Collisions with Wind Turbines: A Summary of Existing Studies and Comparisons to Other Sources of Avian Collision Mortality in the United States},
author = {Erickson, Wallace P. and Johnson, Gregory D. and Strickland, Dale M. and Young, Jr., David P. and Sernka, Karyn J. and Good, Rhett E.},
abstractNote = {It has been estimated that from 100 million to well over 1 billion birds are killed annually in the United States due to collisions with human-made structures, including vehicles, buildings and windows, powerlines, communication towers, and wind turbines. Although wind energy is generally considered environmentally friendly (because it generates electricity without emitting air pollutants or greenhouse gases), the potential for avian fatalities has delayed and even significantly contributed to blocking the development of some windplants in the U.S. Given the importance of developing a viable renewable source of energy, the objective of this paper is to put the issue of avian mortality associated with windpower into perspective with other sources of avian collision mortality across the U.S. The purpose of this paper is to provide a detailed summary of the mortality data collected at windplants and put avian collision mortality associated with windpower development into perspective with other significant sources of avian collision mortality across the United States. We provide a summary of data collected at many of the U.S. windplants and provide annual bird fatality estimates and projections for all wind turbines in the U.S. For comparison, we also review studies of avian collision mortality from other major human-made structures and report annual bird fatality estimates for these sources. Other sources also significantly contribute to overall avian mortality. For example, the National Audubon Society estimates avian mortality due to house cats at 100 million birds per year. Pesticide use, oil spills, disease, etc., are other significant sources of unintended avian mortality. Due to funding constraints, the scope of this paper is limited to examining only avian mortality resulting from collisions with human-made obstacles.},
doi = {10.2172/822418},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {2001},
month = {8}
}