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Title: Corrosion of Titanium Matrix Composites

Abstract

The corrosion behavior of unalloyed Ti and titanium matrix composites containing up to 20 vol% of TiC or TiB{sub 2} was determined in deaerated 2 wt% HCl at 50, 70, and 90 degrees C. Corrosion rates were calculated from corrosion currents determined by extrapolation of the tafel slopes. All curves exhibited active-passive behavior but no transpassive region. Corrosion rates for Ti + TiC composites were similar to those for unalloyed Ti except at 90 degrees C where the composites were slightly higher. Corrosion rates for Ti + TiB{sub 2} composites were generally higher than those for unalloyed Ti and increased with higher concentrations of TiB{sub 2}. XRD and SEM-EDS analyses showed that the TiC reinforcement did not react with the Ti matrix during fabrication while the TiB{sub 2} reacted to form a TiB phase.

Authors:
;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Albany Research Center (ARC), Albany, OR
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Fossil Energy (FE)
OSTI Identifier:
821883
Report Number(s):
DOE/ARC-2002-011
TRN: US200603%%90
Resource Type:
Conference
Resource Relation:
Conference: 15th International Corrosion Congress, Granada, Spain, Sept. 22-27, 2002 (sponsored by ICC--International Corrosion Congress)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
36 MATERIALS SCIENCE; CORROSION; EXTRAPOLATION; FABRICATION; TITANIUM; X-RAY DIFFRACTION; titanium; composite; particulate; titanium carbide; titanium diboride

Citation Formats

Covino, B.S., Jr., and Alman, D.E. Corrosion of Titanium Matrix Composites. United States: N. p., 2002. Web.
Covino, B.S., Jr., & Alman, D.E. Corrosion of Titanium Matrix Composites. United States.
Covino, B.S., Jr., and Alman, D.E. 2002. "Corrosion of Titanium Matrix Composites". United States. doi:. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/821883.
@article{osti_821883,
title = {Corrosion of Titanium Matrix Composites},
author = {Covino, B.S., Jr. and Alman, D.E.},
abstractNote = {The corrosion behavior of unalloyed Ti and titanium matrix composites containing up to 20 vol% of TiC or TiB{sub 2} was determined in deaerated 2 wt% HCl at 50, 70, and 90 degrees C. Corrosion rates were calculated from corrosion currents determined by extrapolation of the tafel slopes. All curves exhibited active-passive behavior but no transpassive region. Corrosion rates for Ti + TiC composites were similar to those for unalloyed Ti except at 90 degrees C where the composites were slightly higher. Corrosion rates for Ti + TiB{sub 2} composites were generally higher than those for unalloyed Ti and increased with higher concentrations of TiB{sub 2}. XRD and SEM-EDS analyses showed that the TiC reinforcement did not react with the Ti matrix during fabrication while the TiB{sub 2} reacted to form a TiB phase.},
doi = {},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = 2002,
month = 9
}

Conference:
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