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Title: SIAM Conference on Geometric Design and Computing. Final Technical Report

Abstract

The SIAM Conference on Geometric Design and Computing attracted 164 domestic and international researchers, from academia, industry, and government. It provided a stimulating forum in which to learn about the latest developments, to discuss exciting new research directions, and to forge stronger ties between theory and applications. Final Report

Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Society for Industrial and Applied Mathematics (US)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Energy Research (ER) (US)
OSTI Identifier:
821108
Report Number(s):
DOE/ER/25446-1
TRN: US200503%%448
DOE Contract Number:
FG02-01ER25446
Resource Type:
Technical Report
Resource Relation:
Other Information: PBD: 11 Mar 2002
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
99 GENERAL AND MISCELLANEOUS//MATHEMATICS, COMPUTING, AND INFORMATION SCIENCE; COMPUTER-AIDED DESIGN; GEOMETRY; RESEARCH PROGRAMS

Citation Formats

None. SIAM Conference on Geometric Design and Computing. Final Technical Report. United States: N. p., 2002. Web. doi:10.2172/821108.
None. SIAM Conference on Geometric Design and Computing. Final Technical Report. United States. doi:10.2172/821108.
None. 2002. "SIAM Conference on Geometric Design and Computing. Final Technical Report". United States. doi:10.2172/821108. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/821108.
@article{osti_821108,
title = {SIAM Conference on Geometric Design and Computing. Final Technical Report},
author = {None},
abstractNote = {The SIAM Conference on Geometric Design and Computing attracted 164 domestic and international researchers, from academia, industry, and government. It provided a stimulating forum in which to learn about the latest developments, to discuss exciting new research directions, and to forge stronger ties between theory and applications. Final Report},
doi = {10.2172/821108},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = 2002,
month = 3
}

Technical Report:

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  • The meeting was divided into the following sessions: (1) CAD/CAM; (2) Curve/Surface Design; (3) Geometric Algorithms; (4) Multiresolution Methods; (5) Robotics; (6) Solid Modeling; and (7) Visualization. This report contains the abstracts of papers presented at the meeting. Proceding the conference there was a short course entitled ``Wavelets for Geometric Modeling and Computer Graphics``.
  • The 21 talks at CSC04 covered a wide gamut of areas including sparse matrix computations, performance aspects of algorithms, automatic differentiation and sparse optimization, mesh generation, combinatorial matrix theory, and computational biology. Each talk was 20 minutes long, and the talks were organized into groups by the six themes listed above; the talks on each theme were followed by a 20 minute discussion on the prominent research issues in that area. The list of speakers, and the titles and extended abstracts of their talks are available at www.tau.ac.il/~stoledo/csc04/.
  • The themes of the 2008 conference included, but were not limited to: Programming languages, models, and compilation techniques; The transition to ubiquitous multicore/manycore processors; Scientific computing on special-purpose processors (Cell, GPUs, etc.); Architecture-aware algorithms; From scalable algorithms to scalable software; Tools for software development and performance evaluation; Global perspectives on HPC; Parallel computing in industry; Distributed/grid computing; Fault tolerance; Parallel visualization and large scale data management; and The future of parallel architectures.
  • In the January 2002 edition of SIAM News, Nick Trefethen announced the '$100, 100-Digit Challenge'. In this note he presented ten easy-to-state but hard-to-solve problems of numerical analysis, and challenged readers to find each answer to ten-digit accuracy. Trefethen closed with the enticing comment: 'Hint: They're hard! If anyone gets 50 digits in total, I will be impressed.' This challenge obviously struck a chord in hundreds of numerical mathematicians worldwide, as 94 teams from 25 nations later submitted entries. Many of these submissions exceeded the target of 50 correct digits; in fact, 20 teams achieved a perfect score of 100more » correct digits. Trefethen had offered $100 for the best submission. Given the overwhelming response, a generous donor (William Browning, founder of Applied Mathematics, Inc.) provided additional funds to provide a $100 award to each of the 20 winning teams. Soon after the results were out, four participants, each from a winning team, got together and agreed to write a book about the problems and their solutions. The team is truly international: Bornemann is from Germany, Laurie is from South Africa, Wagon is from the USA, and Waldvogel is from Switzerland. This book provides some mathematical background for each problem, and then shows in detail how each of them can be solved. In fact, multiple solution techniques are mentioned in each case. The book describes how to extend these solutions to much larger problems and much higher numeric precision (hundreds or thousands of digit accuracy). The authors also show how to compute error bounds for the results, so that one can say with confidence that one's results are accurate to the level stated. Numerous numerical software tools are demonstrated in the process, including the commercial products Mathematica, Maple and Matlab. Computer programs that perform many of the algorithms mentioned in the book are provided, both in an appendix to the book and on a website. In the process, the authors take the reader on a wide-ranging tour of modern numerical mathematics, with enough background material so that even readers with little or no training in numerical analysis can follow. Here is a list of just a few of the topics visited: numerical quadrature (i.e., numerical integration), series summation, sequence extrapolation, contour integration, Fourier integrals, high-precision arithmetic, interval arithmetic, symbolic computing, numerical linear algebra, perturbation theory, Euler-Maclaurin summation, global minimization, eigenvalue methods, evolutionary algorithms, matrix preconditioning, random walks, special functions, elliptic functions, Monte-Carlo methods, and numerical differentiation.« less
  • This paper contains general information on the third SIAM conference on parallel processing for scientific computing. Abstracts of the papers on parallel processing architecture are listed. (LSP)