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Title: Advanced Reactors Around the World

Abstract

At the end of 2002, 441 nuclear power plants were operating around the globe and providing 17% of the world's electricity. Although the rate of population growth has slowed, recent United Nations data suggest that two billion more people will be added to the world by 2050. A special report commissioned by the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change estimated that electricity demand would grow almost eight-fold from 2000 to 2050 in a high economic grown scenario and more than double in a low-growth scenario. There is also a global aspiration to keep the environment pristine. Because of these reasons, it is expected that a large number of new nuclear reactors may be operating by 2050. Realization of this has created an impetus for the development of a new generation of reactors in several countries. The goal is to make nuclear power cost-competitive with other resources and to enhance safety to a level that no evacuation outside a plant site would be necessary. It should also generate less waste, prevent materials diversion for weapons production, and be sustainable. This article discusses the status of next-generation reactors under development around the world. Specifically highlighted are efforts related to the Generation IV Internationalmore » Forum (GIF) and its six reactor concepts for research and development: Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR); Gas-Cooled Fast Reactor (GFR); Supercritical Water-Cooled Reactor (SCWR); Sodium-Cooled Fast Reactor (SFR); Lead-Cooled Fast Reactor (LFR); and Molten Salt Reactor (MSR). Also highlighted are nuclear activities specific to Russia and India.« less

Authors:
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
U.S. DOE Idaho Operations Office, Idaho Falls, ID (US)
Sponsoring Org.:
US Department of Energy (US)
OSTI Identifier:
820908
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Nuclear Plant Journal; Journal Volume: 21; Journal Issue: 5; Other Information: September-October 2003 issue; PBD: 1 Sep 2003
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
21 SPECIFIC NUCLEAR REACTORS AND ASSOCIATED PLANTS; 29 ENERGY PLANNING, POLICY AND ECONOMY; 22 GENERAL STUDIES OF NUCLEAR REACTORS; CLIMATES; ECONOMICS; ELECTRICITY; FAST REACTORS; INDIA; MOLTEN SALT REACTORS; NUCLEAR POWER; NUCLEAR POWER PLANTS; PRODUCTION; REACTORS; SAFETY; UNITED NATIONS; WATER COOLED REACTORS; WEAPONS; NUCLEAR REACTORS; GENERATION IV; UNITED STATES; RUSSIA

Citation Formats

Majumdar, Debu. Advanced Reactors Around the World. United States: N. p., 2003. Web.
Majumdar, Debu. Advanced Reactors Around the World. United States.
Majumdar, Debu. 2003. "Advanced Reactors Around the World". United States. doi:.
@article{osti_820908,
title = {Advanced Reactors Around the World},
author = {Majumdar, Debu},
abstractNote = {At the end of 2002, 441 nuclear power plants were operating around the globe and providing 17% of the world's electricity. Although the rate of population growth has slowed, recent United Nations data suggest that two billion more people will be added to the world by 2050. A special report commissioned by the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change estimated that electricity demand would grow almost eight-fold from 2000 to 2050 in a high economic grown scenario and more than double in a low-growth scenario. There is also a global aspiration to keep the environment pristine. Because of these reasons, it is expected that a large number of new nuclear reactors may be operating by 2050. Realization of this has created an impetus for the development of a new generation of reactors in several countries. The goal is to make nuclear power cost-competitive with other resources and to enhance safety to a level that no evacuation outside a plant site would be necessary. It should also generate less waste, prevent materials diversion for weapons production, and be sustainable. This article discusses the status of next-generation reactors under development around the world. Specifically highlighted are efforts related to the Generation IV International Forum (GIF) and its six reactor concepts for research and development: Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR); Gas-Cooled Fast Reactor (GFR); Supercritical Water-Cooled Reactor (SCWR); Sodium-Cooled Fast Reactor (SFR); Lead-Cooled Fast Reactor (LFR); and Molten Salt Reactor (MSR). Also highlighted are nuclear activities specific to Russia and India.},
doi = {},
journal = {Nuclear Plant Journal},
number = 5,
volume = 21,
place = {United States},
year = 2003,
month = 9
}
  • The essential features of power reactors in operation or planned are summarized in tabular form. The reactors are grouped by type of coolant. The table includes information on power, fuel, moderator, coolant, steam generation, designer, builder, owner, and operator. (M.C.G.)
  • A table is presented on the testing research, and train ing reactors of the world. Power and experimental reactors and subcritical assemblies are excluded. The items included in the table are thermal power, fuel element characteristics, coolant/moderator/reflector used, maximum flux, designer/ builder, owner/operator, and remarks on reactor type and use. Notes are also given. (D.L.C.)
  • The nuclear-powered merchant vessel whose keel is scheduled to be laid in March 1958 is described. This will be the world's third nuclear-propelled surface ship, but the first one with a completely unclassified power plant. Four advanced reactor concepts for merchant ship propulsion--pressurized water, boiling water, organic moderated, and gas-cooled designs---are described. A survey of worldwide efforts by maritime countries in the field of nuclear surface ship propulsion is presented. (L.T.W.)