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Title: TITLE 5 DATA MANAGEMENT ON THE HANFORD RESERVATION

Abstract

The Title V air operating permit program has imposed reporting and certification requirements on the regulated community. For the US Department of Energy's Hanford Reservation, these requirements have presented a unique data management challenge. Addressing this challenge has necessitated development of electronic data management tools. The Hanford Reservation, a 560 square mile site located in Southeastern Washington State, qualifies as a major stationary source. There are more than 350 emission units on the site with hundreds of notices of construction (NOCs) that contain nearly 2,000 individual approval conditions. The number of active NOCs and approval conditions changes monthly as new cleanup projects begin and others end. Three regulatory agencies and the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency share responsibility for enforcing the Clean Air Act requirements on the Hanford Reservation. Additionally, numerous contractors are responsible for managing the emission units and ensuring compliance with the applicable requirements. To track and report this large and fluid number of conditions and contractors, two new electronic management tools were developed, a Microsoft Access97{reg_sign} application, and an Intranet homepage. The presentation demonstrates these tools.

Authors:
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
WMH (US)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Environmental Management (EM) (US)
OSTI Identifier:
820822
Report Number(s):
HNF-5268-FP, Rev.0
TRN: US200407%%312
DOE Contract Number:
AC06-96RL13200
Resource Type:
Conference
Resource Relation:
Conference: Conference title not supplied, Conference location not supplied, Conference dates not supplied; Other Information: PBD: 1 Nov 1999
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
29 ENERGY PLANNING, POLICY AND ECONOMY; AIR; CLEAN AIR ACTS; COMPLIANCE; CONSTRUCTION; CONTRACTORS; HANFORD RESERVATION; MANAGEMENT; US EPA; WASHINGTON

Citation Formats

CURN, B.L.. TITLE 5 DATA MANAGEMENT ON THE HANFORD RESERVATION. United States: N. p., 1999. Web.
CURN, B.L.. TITLE 5 DATA MANAGEMENT ON THE HANFORD RESERVATION. United States.
CURN, B.L.. 1999. "TITLE 5 DATA MANAGEMENT ON THE HANFORD RESERVATION". United States. doi:. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/820822.
@article{osti_820822,
title = {TITLE 5 DATA MANAGEMENT ON THE HANFORD RESERVATION},
author = {CURN, B.L.},
abstractNote = {The Title V air operating permit program has imposed reporting and certification requirements on the regulated community. For the US Department of Energy's Hanford Reservation, these requirements have presented a unique data management challenge. Addressing this challenge has necessitated development of electronic data management tools. The Hanford Reservation, a 560 square mile site located in Southeastern Washington State, qualifies as a major stationary source. There are more than 350 emission units on the site with hundreds of notices of construction (NOCs) that contain nearly 2,000 individual approval conditions. The number of active NOCs and approval conditions changes monthly as new cleanup projects begin and others end. Three regulatory agencies and the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency share responsibility for enforcing the Clean Air Act requirements on the Hanford Reservation. Additionally, numerous contractors are responsible for managing the emission units and ensuring compliance with the applicable requirements. To track and report this large and fluid number of conditions and contractors, two new electronic management tools were developed, a Microsoft Access97{reg_sign} application, and an Intranet homepage. The presentation demonstrates these tools.},
doi = {},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = 1999,
month =
}

Conference:
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  • Niagara Mohawk Power Corporation (NMPC) has developed a data management system to handle Continuous Emissions Monitoring System (CEMS) data collected to meet the requirements of Title IV of the Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990. The NMPC data management system described in this paper has three components: hardware, software, and procedures. The data management system`s hardware consists of computers and the existing wide area network system. The systems includes a Data Acquisition and Handling System (DAHS) computer at each stack, a database server at the corporate offices, a wide area network for data transfer from the DAHS to the server,more » a CEMS workstation, and PCs connected to the network. The second component of the system is the software. The DAHS uses a program that acquires the data and generates all the required reports. It is the only certified software. Data review, analysis and preparation for submittal is done through commercial software products and programs developed in-house. The last component, procedures, governs the flow of data from the stack to the diskette submitted under the Designated Representative`s signature. This component is included to document that all the data have been reviewed completely.« less
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