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Title: EPRI tries to integrate utility information systems

Abstract

Utilities spent $5 billion on information technology in 1994, according to market research firm Newton Evans Research Co. The Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) estimates half was spent trying to integrate systems not designed to operate together. To solve this problem, EPRI has developed what it calls the Utility Communications Architecture (UCA). It was developed under the guidance of industry experts and utilities to provide a set of standards to integrate communications between utilities and systems.

Authors:
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
81813
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Electric Light and Power; Journal Volume: 73; Journal Issue: 4; Other Information: PBD: Apr 1995
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
29 ENERGY PLANNING AND POLICY; 99 MATHEMATICS, COMPUTERS, INFORMATION SCIENCE, MANAGEMENT, LAW, MISCELLANEOUS; INFORMATION SYSTEMS; STANDARDS; APPROPRIATE TECHNOLOGY; ELECTRIC UTILITIES; COMMUNICATIONS; ELECTRIC POWER INDUSTRY; EPRI

Citation Formats

Hansen, T. EPRI tries to integrate utility information systems. United States: N. p., 1995. Web.
Hansen, T. EPRI tries to integrate utility information systems. United States.
Hansen, T. Sat . "EPRI tries to integrate utility information systems". United States. doi:.
@article{osti_81813,
title = {EPRI tries to integrate utility information systems},
author = {Hansen, T.},
abstractNote = {Utilities spent $5 billion on information technology in 1994, according to market research firm Newton Evans Research Co. The Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) estimates half was spent trying to integrate systems not designed to operate together. To solve this problem, EPRI has developed what it calls the Utility Communications Architecture (UCA). It was developed under the guidance of industry experts and utilities to provide a set of standards to integrate communications between utilities and systems.},
doi = {},
journal = {Electric Light and Power},
number = 4,
volume = 73,
place = {United States},
year = {Sat Apr 01 00:00:00 EST 1995},
month = {Sat Apr 01 00:00:00 EST 1995}
}
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