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Title: Neural Networks

Abstract

Physicists use large detectors to measure particles created in high-energy collisions at particle accelerators. These detectors typically produce signals indicating either where ionization occurs along the path of the particle, or where energy is deposited by the particle. The data produced by these signals is fed into pattern recognition programs to try to identify what particles were produced, and to measure the energy and direction of these particles. Ideally, there are many techniques used in this pattern recognition software. One technique, neural networks, is particularly suitable for identifying what type of particle caused by a set of energy deposits. Neural networks can derive meaning from complicated or imprecise data, extract patterns, and detect trends that are too complex to be noticed by either humans or other computer related processes. To assist in the advancement of this technology, Physicists use a tool kit to experiment with several neural network techniques. The goal of this research is interface a neural network tool kit into Java Analysis Studio (JAS3), an application that allows data to be analyzed from any experiment. As the final result, a physicist will have the ability to train, test, and implement a neural network with the desired output whilemore » using JAS3 to analyze the results or output. Before an implementation of a neural network can take place, a firm understanding of what a neural network is and how it works is beneficial. A neural network is an artificial representation of the human brain that tries to simulate the learning process [5]. It is also important to think of the word artificial in that definition as computer programs that use calculations during the learning process. In short, a neural network learns by representative examples. Perhaps the easiest way to describe the way neural networks learn is to explain how the human brain functions. The human brain contains billions of neural cells that are responsible for processing information [2]. Each one of these cells acts as a simple processor. When individual cells interact with one another, the complex abilities of the brain are made possible. In neural networks, the input or data are processed by a propagation function that adds up the values of all the incoming data. The ending value is then compared with a threshold or specific value. The resulting value must exceed the activation function value in order to become output. The activation function is a mathematical function that a neuron uses to produce an output referring to its input value. [8] Figure 1 depicts this process. Neural networks usually have three components an input, a hidden, and an output. These layers create the end result of the neural network. A real world example is a child associating the word dog with a picture. The child says dog and simultaneously looks a picture of a dog. The input is the spoken word ''dog'', the hidden is the brain processing, and the output will be the category of the word dog based on the picture. This illustration describes how a neural network functions.« less

Authors:
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Stanford Linear Accelerator Center, Menlo Park, CA (US)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Science (US)
OSTI Identifier:
815740
Report Number(s):
SLAC-TN-03-028
TRN: US0304780
DOE Contract Number:  
AC03-76SF00515
Resource Type:
Technical Report
Resource Relation:
Other Information: PBD: 23 Sep 2003
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
43 PARTICLE ACCELERATORS; ACCELERATORS; BRAIN; COMPUTER CODES; COMPUTERS; IMPLEMENTATION; IONIZATION; JAVA; LEARNING; NERVE CELLS; NEURAL NETWORKS; PATTERN RECOGNITION; PROCESSING

Citation Formats

Smith, Patrick I. Neural Networks. United States: N. p., 2003. Web. doi:10.2172/815740.
Smith, Patrick I. Neural Networks. United States. doi:10.2172/815740.
Smith, Patrick I. Tue . "Neural Networks". United States. doi:10.2172/815740. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/815740.
@article{osti_815740,
title = {Neural Networks},
author = {Smith, Patrick I.},
abstractNote = {Physicists use large detectors to measure particles created in high-energy collisions at particle accelerators. These detectors typically produce signals indicating either where ionization occurs along the path of the particle, or where energy is deposited by the particle. The data produced by these signals is fed into pattern recognition programs to try to identify what particles were produced, and to measure the energy and direction of these particles. Ideally, there are many techniques used in this pattern recognition software. One technique, neural networks, is particularly suitable for identifying what type of particle caused by a set of energy deposits. Neural networks can derive meaning from complicated or imprecise data, extract patterns, and detect trends that are too complex to be noticed by either humans or other computer related processes. To assist in the advancement of this technology, Physicists use a tool kit to experiment with several neural network techniques. The goal of this research is interface a neural network tool kit into Java Analysis Studio (JAS3), an application that allows data to be analyzed from any experiment. As the final result, a physicist will have the ability to train, test, and implement a neural network with the desired output while using JAS3 to analyze the results or output. Before an implementation of a neural network can take place, a firm understanding of what a neural network is and how it works is beneficial. A neural network is an artificial representation of the human brain that tries to simulate the learning process [5]. It is also important to think of the word artificial in that definition as computer programs that use calculations during the learning process. In short, a neural network learns by representative examples. Perhaps the easiest way to describe the way neural networks learn is to explain how the human brain functions. The human brain contains billions of neural cells that are responsible for processing information [2]. Each one of these cells acts as a simple processor. When individual cells interact with one another, the complex abilities of the brain are made possible. In neural networks, the input or data are processed by a propagation function that adds up the values of all the incoming data. The ending value is then compared with a threshold or specific value. The resulting value must exceed the activation function value in order to become output. The activation function is a mathematical function that a neuron uses to produce an output referring to its input value. [8] Figure 1 depicts this process. Neural networks usually have three components an input, a hidden, and an output. These layers create the end result of the neural network. A real world example is a child associating the word dog with a picture. The child says dog and simultaneously looks a picture of a dog. The input is the spoken word ''dog'', the hidden is the brain processing, and the output will be the category of the word dog based on the picture. This illustration describes how a neural network functions.},
doi = {10.2172/815740},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {Tue Sep 23 00:00:00 EDT 2003},
month = {Tue Sep 23 00:00:00 EDT 2003}
}

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