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Title: 2002 Hyperspectral Analysis of Hazardous Waste Sites on the Savannah River Site

Abstract

Hazardous waste site inspection is a labor intensive, time consuming job, performed primarily on the ground using visual inspection and instrumentation. It is an expensive process to continually monitor hazardous waste and/or landfill sites to determine if they are maintaining their integrity. In certain instances, it may be possible to monitor aspects of the hazardous waste sites and landfills remotely. The utilization of multispectral data was suggested for the mapping of clays and iron oxides associated with contaminated groundwater, vegetation stress, and methane gas emissions (which require longer wavelength detectors). The Savannah River Site (SRS) near Aiken, S.C. is a United States Department of Energy facility operated by the Westinghouse Savannah River Company. For decades the SRS was responsible for developing weapons grade plutonium and other materials for the nation's nuclear defense. Hazardous waste was generated during this process. Waste storage site inspection is a particularly important issue at the SRS because there are over 100 hazardous waste sites scattered throughout the 300 mile complex making it difficult to continually monitor all of the facilities. The goal is to use remote sensing technology to identify surface anomalies on the hazardous waste sites as early as possible so that remedial workmore » can take place rapidly to maintain the integrity of the storage sites. The anomalous areas are then targeted for intensive in situ human examination and measurement. During the 1990s, many of the hazardous waste sites were capped with protective layers of polyethelene sheeting and soil, and planted with bahia grass and/or centipede grass. This research investigated hyperspectral remote sensing technology to determine if it can be used to measure accurately and monitor possible indicators of change on vegetated hazardous waste sites. Specifically, it evaluated the usefulness of hyperspectral remote sensing to assess the condition of vegetation on clay- caps on the Mixed Waste Management Facility (MWMF). This report first describes the principles of hyperspectral remote sensing. In situ measurement and hyperspectral remote sensing methods used to analyze hazardous waste sites on the Savannah River Site are then presented.« less

Authors:
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Savannah River Site (US)
Sponsoring Org.:
US Department of Energy (US)
OSTI Identifier:
814723
Report Number(s):
WSRC-TR-2003-00275
TRN: US200318%%181
DOE Contract Number:
AC09-96SR18500
Resource Type:
Technical Report
Resource Relation:
Other Information: PBD: 28 Aug 2003
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
03 NATURAL GAS; CLAYS; GRAMINEAE; IRON OXIDES; METHANE; MONITORS; PLANTS; PLUTONIUM; REMOTE SENSING; SANITARY LANDFILLS; STORAGE; WASTE MANAGEMENT; WASTE STORAGE; WASTES; WAVELENGTHS

Citation Formats

Gladden, J.B.. 2002 Hyperspectral Analysis of Hazardous Waste Sites on the Savannah River Site. United States: N. p., 2003. Web. doi:10.2172/814723.
Gladden, J.B.. 2002 Hyperspectral Analysis of Hazardous Waste Sites on the Savannah River Site. United States. doi:10.2172/814723.
Gladden, J.B.. Thu . "2002 Hyperspectral Analysis of Hazardous Waste Sites on the Savannah River Site". United States. doi:10.2172/814723. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/814723.
@article{osti_814723,
title = {2002 Hyperspectral Analysis of Hazardous Waste Sites on the Savannah River Site},
author = {Gladden, J.B.},
abstractNote = {Hazardous waste site inspection is a labor intensive, time consuming job, performed primarily on the ground using visual inspection and instrumentation. It is an expensive process to continually monitor hazardous waste and/or landfill sites to determine if they are maintaining their integrity. In certain instances, it may be possible to monitor aspects of the hazardous waste sites and landfills remotely. The utilization of multispectral data was suggested for the mapping of clays and iron oxides associated with contaminated groundwater, vegetation stress, and methane gas emissions (which require longer wavelength detectors). The Savannah River Site (SRS) near Aiken, S.C. is a United States Department of Energy facility operated by the Westinghouse Savannah River Company. For decades the SRS was responsible for developing weapons grade plutonium and other materials for the nation's nuclear defense. Hazardous waste was generated during this process. Waste storage site inspection is a particularly important issue at the SRS because there are over 100 hazardous waste sites scattered throughout the 300 mile complex making it difficult to continually monitor all of the facilities. The goal is to use remote sensing technology to identify surface anomalies on the hazardous waste sites as early as possible so that remedial work can take place rapidly to maintain the integrity of the storage sites. The anomalous areas are then targeted for intensive in situ human examination and measurement. During the 1990s, many of the hazardous waste sites were capped with protective layers of polyethelene sheeting and soil, and planted with bahia grass and/or centipede grass. This research investigated hyperspectral remote sensing technology to determine if it can be used to measure accurately and monitor possible indicators of change on vegetated hazardous waste sites. Specifically, it evaluated the usefulness of hyperspectral remote sensing to assess the condition of vegetation on clay- caps on the Mixed Waste Management Facility (MWMF). This report first describes the principles of hyperspectral remote sensing. In situ measurement and hyperspectral remote sensing methods used to analyze hazardous waste sites on the Savannah River Site are then presented.},
doi = {10.2172/814723},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {Thu Aug 28 00:00:00 EDT 2003},
month = {Thu Aug 28 00:00:00 EDT 2003}
}

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