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Title: Genetic Modification of Short Rotation Poplar Biomass Feedstock for Efficient Conversion to Ethanol

Abstract

The Bioenergy Feedstock Development Program, Environmental Sciences Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory is developing poplars (Populus species and hybrids) as sources of renewable energy, i.e., ethanol. Notable increases in adaptability, volume productivity, and pest/stress resistance have been achieved via classical selection and breeding and intensified cultural practices. Significant advances have also been made in the efficiencies of harvesting and handling systems. Given these and anticipated accomplishments, program leaders are considering shifting some attention to genetically modifying feedstock physical and chemical properties, so as to improve the efficiency with which feedstocks can be converted to ethanol. This report provides an in-depth review and synthesis of opportunities for and feasibilities of genetically modifying feedstock qualities via classical selection and breeding, marker-aided selection and breeding, and genetic transformation. Information was collected by analysis of the literature, with emphasis on that published since 1995, and interviews with prominent scientists, breeders, and growers. Poplar research is well advanced, and literature is abundant. The report therefore primarily reflects advances in poplars, but data from other species, particularly other shortrotation hardwoods, are incorporated to fill gaps. An executive summary and recommendations for research, development, and technology transfer are provided immediately after the table of contents. The firstmore » major section of the report describes processes most likely to be used for conversion of poplar biomass to ethanol, the various physical and chemical properties of poplar feedstocks, and how such properties are expected to affect process efficiency. The need is stressed for improved understanding of the impact of change on both overall process and individual process step efficiencies. The second part documents advances in trait measurement instrumentation and methodology. The importance of these and future developments is emphasized, since trait measurement constitutes the largest cost associated with adding additional traits to improvement efforts, regardless of genetic approach. In subsequent sections, recent and projected advances in classical selection and breeding, marker-aided selection, and genetic transformation are documented and used to evaluate the feasibility of individual approaches. Interviews with specialists engaged in research and development on each approach were given particular emphasis in gauging feasibilities and defining future needs and directions. Summaries of important findings and major conclusions are presented at the end of individual sections. Closing portions describe the targeted workshop, conducted in December 1999 and list interviewees and literature cited in the text. Information obtained at the workshop was used to improve accuracy, refine conclusions, and recommend priorities for future research, development, and technology transfer.« less

Authors:
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
US Department of Energy (US)
OSTI Identifier:
814106
Report Number(s):
ORNL/SUB/99-4500007253/1
TRN: US200316%%452
DOE Contract Number:  
AC05-00OR22725
Resource Type:
Technical Report
Resource Relation:
Other Information: PBD: 30 Aug 2000
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
09 BIOMASS FUELS; 29 ENERGY PLANNING, POLICY AND ECONOMY; ACCURACY; BIOMASS; BREEDING; CHEMICAL PROPERTIES; EFFICIENCY; ETHANOL; GENETICS; HARVESTING; MODIFICATIONS; POPLARS; SYNTHESIS; TECHNOLOGY TRANSFER; TRANSFORMATIONS; RENEWABLE ENERGY SOURCES

Citation Formats

Dinus, R J. Genetic Modification of Short Rotation Poplar Biomass Feedstock for Efficient Conversion to Ethanol. United States: N. p., 2000. Web. doi:10.2172/814106.
Dinus, R J. Genetic Modification of Short Rotation Poplar Biomass Feedstock for Efficient Conversion to Ethanol. United States. https://doi.org/10.2172/814106
Dinus, R J. 2000. "Genetic Modification of Short Rotation Poplar Biomass Feedstock for Efficient Conversion to Ethanol". United States. https://doi.org/10.2172/814106. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/814106.
@article{osti_814106,
title = {Genetic Modification of Short Rotation Poplar Biomass Feedstock for Efficient Conversion to Ethanol},
author = {Dinus, R J},
abstractNote = {The Bioenergy Feedstock Development Program, Environmental Sciences Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory is developing poplars (Populus species and hybrids) as sources of renewable energy, i.e., ethanol. Notable increases in adaptability, volume productivity, and pest/stress resistance have been achieved via classical selection and breeding and intensified cultural practices. Significant advances have also been made in the efficiencies of harvesting and handling systems. Given these and anticipated accomplishments, program leaders are considering shifting some attention to genetically modifying feedstock physical and chemical properties, so as to improve the efficiency with which feedstocks can be converted to ethanol. This report provides an in-depth review and synthesis of opportunities for and feasibilities of genetically modifying feedstock qualities via classical selection and breeding, marker-aided selection and breeding, and genetic transformation. Information was collected by analysis of the literature, with emphasis on that published since 1995, and interviews with prominent scientists, breeders, and growers. Poplar research is well advanced, and literature is abundant. The report therefore primarily reflects advances in poplars, but data from other species, particularly other shortrotation hardwoods, are incorporated to fill gaps. An executive summary and recommendations for research, development, and technology transfer are provided immediately after the table of contents. The first major section of the report describes processes most likely to be used for conversion of poplar biomass to ethanol, the various physical and chemical properties of poplar feedstocks, and how such properties are expected to affect process efficiency. The need is stressed for improved understanding of the impact of change on both overall process and individual process step efficiencies. The second part documents advances in trait measurement instrumentation and methodology. The importance of these and future developments is emphasized, since trait measurement constitutes the largest cost associated with adding additional traits to improvement efforts, regardless of genetic approach. In subsequent sections, recent and projected advances in classical selection and breeding, marker-aided selection, and genetic transformation are documented and used to evaluate the feasibility of individual approaches. Interviews with specialists engaged in research and development on each approach were given particular emphasis in gauging feasibilities and defining future needs and directions. Summaries of important findings and major conclusions are presented at the end of individual sections. Closing portions describe the targeted workshop, conducted in December 1999 and list interviewees and literature cited in the text. Information obtained at the workshop was used to improve accuracy, refine conclusions, and recommend priorities for future research, development, and technology transfer.},
doi = {10.2172/814106},
url = {https://www.osti.gov/biblio/814106}, journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {2000},
month = {8}
}