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Title: OVERVIEW OF RECENT EXPERIMENTAL RESULTS FROM THE DIII-D ADVANCED TOKAMAK PROGRAM

Abstract

OAK A271 OVERVIEW OF RECENT EXPERIMENTAL RESULTS FROM THE DIII-D ADVANCED TOKAMAK PROGRAM. The DIII-D research program is developing the scientific basis for advanced tokamak (AT) modes of operation in order to enhance the attractiveness of the tokamak as an energy producing system. Since the last International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) meeting, they have made significant progress in developing the building blocks needed for AT operation: (1) they have doubled the magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) stable tokamak operating space through rotational stabilization of the resistive wall mode; (2) using this rotational stabilization, they have achieved {beta}{sub N}H{sub 89} {ge} 10 for 4 {tau}{sub E} limited by the neoclassical tearing mode; (3) using real-time feedback of the electron cyclotron current drive (ECCD) location, they have stabilized the (m,n) = (3,2) neoclassical tearing mode and then increased {beta}{sub T} by 60%; (4) they have produced ECCD stabilization of the (2,1) neoclassical tearing mode in initial experiments; (5) they have made the first integrated AT demonstration discharges with current profile control using ECCD; (6) ECCD and electron cyclotron heating (ECH) have been used to control the pressure profile in high performance plasmas; and (7) they have demonstrated stationary tokamak operation for 6.5 s (36 {tau}{submore » E}) at the same fusion gain parameter of {beta}{sub N}H{sub 89}/q{sub 95}{sup 2} {approx} 0.4 as ITER but at much higher q{sub 95} = 4.2. The authors have developed general improvements applicable to conventional and advanced tokamak operating modes: (1) they have an existence proof of a mode of tokamak operation, quiescent H-mode, which has no pulsed, ELM heat load to the divertor and which can run for long periods of time (3.8 s or 25 {tau}{sub E}) with constant density and constant radiated power; (2) they have demonstrated real-time disruption detection and mitigation for vertical disruption events using high pressure gas jet injection of noble gases; (3) they have found that the heat and particle fluxes to the inner strike points of balanced, double-null divertors are much smaller than to the outer strike points. They have made detailed investigations of the edge pedestal and SOL: (1) Atomic physics and plasma physics both play significant roles in setting the width of the edge density barrier in H-mode; (2) ELM heat flux conducted to the divertor decreases as density increases; (3) Intermittent, bursty transport contributes to cross field particle transport in the scrape-off layer (SOL) of H-mode and, especially, L-mode plasmas.« less

Authors:
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
GENERAL ATOMICS (US)
Sponsoring Org.:
(US)
OSTI Identifier:
813672
DOE Contract Number:
AC03-99ER54463
Resource Type:
Conference
Resource Relation:
Conference: Conference title not supplied, Conference location not supplied, Conference dates not supplied; Other Information: THIS IS A PREPRINT OF A PAPER TO BE SUBMITTED FOR PUBLICATION IN NUCLEAR FUSION.; PBD: 1 Nov 2002
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
43 PARTICLE ACCELERATORS; ATOMIC PHYSICS; CYCLOTRONS; DETECTION; DIVERTORS; DOUBLET-3 DEVICE; ELECTRONS; HEAT FLUX; HEATING; IAEA; MAGNETOHYDRODYNAMICS; PHYSICS; RARE GASES; RESEARCH PROGRAMS; STABILIZATION

Citation Formats

BURRELL,HK. OVERVIEW OF RECENT EXPERIMENTAL RESULTS FROM THE DIII-D ADVANCED TOKAMAK PROGRAM. United States: N. p., 2002. Web.
BURRELL,HK. OVERVIEW OF RECENT EXPERIMENTAL RESULTS FROM THE DIII-D ADVANCED TOKAMAK PROGRAM. United States.
BURRELL,HK. Fri . "OVERVIEW OF RECENT EXPERIMENTAL RESULTS FROM THE DIII-D ADVANCED TOKAMAK PROGRAM". United States. doi:. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/813672.
@article{osti_813672,
title = {OVERVIEW OF RECENT EXPERIMENTAL RESULTS FROM THE DIII-D ADVANCED TOKAMAK PROGRAM},
author = {BURRELL,HK},
abstractNote = {OAK A271 OVERVIEW OF RECENT EXPERIMENTAL RESULTS FROM THE DIII-D ADVANCED TOKAMAK PROGRAM. The DIII-D research program is developing the scientific basis for advanced tokamak (AT) modes of operation in order to enhance the attractiveness of the tokamak as an energy producing system. Since the last International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) meeting, they have made significant progress in developing the building blocks needed for AT operation: (1) they have doubled the magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) stable tokamak operating space through rotational stabilization of the resistive wall mode; (2) using this rotational stabilization, they have achieved {beta}{sub N}H{sub 89} {ge} 10 for 4 {tau}{sub E} limited by the neoclassical tearing mode; (3) using real-time feedback of the electron cyclotron current drive (ECCD) location, they have stabilized the (m,n) = (3,2) neoclassical tearing mode and then increased {beta}{sub T} by 60%; (4) they have produced ECCD stabilization of the (2,1) neoclassical tearing mode in initial experiments; (5) they have made the first integrated AT demonstration discharges with current profile control using ECCD; (6) ECCD and electron cyclotron heating (ECH) have been used to control the pressure profile in high performance plasmas; and (7) they have demonstrated stationary tokamak operation for 6.5 s (36 {tau}{sub E}) at the same fusion gain parameter of {beta}{sub N}H{sub 89}/q{sub 95}{sup 2} {approx} 0.4 as ITER but at much higher q{sub 95} = 4.2. The authors have developed general improvements applicable to conventional and advanced tokamak operating modes: (1) they have an existence proof of a mode of tokamak operation, quiescent H-mode, which has no pulsed, ELM heat load to the divertor and which can run for long periods of time (3.8 s or 25 {tau}{sub E}) with constant density and constant radiated power; (2) they have demonstrated real-time disruption detection and mitigation for vertical disruption events using high pressure gas jet injection of noble gases; (3) they have found that the heat and particle fluxes to the inner strike points of balanced, double-null divertors are much smaller than to the outer strike points. They have made detailed investigations of the edge pedestal and SOL: (1) Atomic physics and plasma physics both play significant roles in setting the width of the edge density barrier in H-mode; (2) ELM heat flux conducted to the divertor decreases as density increases; (3) Intermittent, bursty transport contributes to cross field particle transport in the scrape-off layer (SOL) of H-mode and, especially, L-mode plasmas.},
doi = {},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {Fri Nov 01 00:00:00 EST 2002},
month = {Fri Nov 01 00:00:00 EST 2002}
}

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  • OAK A271 OVERVIEW OF RECENT EXPERIMENTAL RESULTS FROM THE DIII-D ADVANCED TOKAMAK PROGRAM. The DIII-D research program is developing the scientific basis for advanced tokamak (AT) modes of operation in order to enhance the attractiveness of the tokamak as an energy producing system. Since the last International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) meeting, the authors have made significant progress in developing the building blocks needed for AT operation: (1) the authors have doubled the magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) stable tokamak operating space through rotational stabilization of the resistive wall mode; (2) using this rotational stabilization, they have achieved {beta}{sub N}H{sub 89} {le} 10more » for 4 {tau}{sub E} limited by the neoclassical tearing mode; (3) using real-time feedback of the electron cyclotron current drive (ECCD) location, they have stabilized the (m,n) = (3,2) neoclassical tearing mode and then increased {beta}{sub T} by 60%; (4) they have produced ECCD stabilization of the (2,1) neoclassical tearing mode in initial experiments; (5) they have made the first integrated AT demonstration discharges with current profile control using ECCD; (6) ECCD and electron cyclotron heating (ECH) have been used to control the pressure profile in high performance plasmas; and (7) they have demonstrated stationary tokamak operation for 6.5 s (36 {tau}{sub E}) at the same fusion gain parameter of {beta}{sub N}H{sub 89}/q{sub 95}{sup 2} {approx} 0.4 as ITER but at much higher q{sub 95} = 4.2. They have developed general improvements applicable to conventional and advanced tokamak operating modes: (1) they have an existence proof of a mode of tokamak operation, quiescent H-mode, which has no pulsed, ELM heat load to the divertor and which can run for long periods of time (3.8 s or 25 {tau}{sub E}) with constant density and constant radiation power; (2) they have demonstrated real-time disruption detection and mitigation for vertical disruption events using high pressure gas jet injection of noble gases; (3) they have found that the heat and particle fluxes to the inner strike points of balanced, double-null divertors are much smaller than to the outer strike points.« less
  • The DIII-D research program is developing the scientific basis for advanced tokamak (AT) modes of operation in order to enhance the attractiveness of the tokamak as an energy producing system. Since the last international atomic energy agency (IAEA) meeting, we have made significant progress in developing the building blocks needed for AT operation: (1) we have doubled the magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) stable tokamak operating space through rotational stabilization of the resistive wall mode; (2) using this rotational stabilization, we have achieved {beta}{sub N}H{sub 89} {ge} 10 for 4{tau}{sub E} limited by the neoclassical tearing mode (NTM); (3) using real-time feedback ofmore » the electron cyclotron current drive (ECCD) location, we have stabilized the (m, n) = (3, 2) NTM and then increased {beta}{sub T} by 60%; (4) we have produced ECCD stabilization of the (2, 1) NTM in initial experiments; (5) we have made the first integrated AT demonstration discharges with current profile control using ECCD; (6) ECCD and electron cyclotron heating (ECH) have been used to control the pressure profile in high performance plasmas; and (7) we have demonstrated stationary tokamak operation for 6.5 s (36{tau}{sub E}) at the same fusion gain parameter of {beta}{sub N}H{sub 89}/q{sub 95}{sup 2} {approx_equal} as ITER but at much higher q{sub 95} = 4.2. We have developed general improvements applicable to conventional and AT operating modes: (1) we have an existence proof of a mode of tokamak operation, quiescent H-mode, which has no pulsed, edge localized modes (ELM) heat load to the divertor and which can run for long periods of time (3.8 s or 25{tau}{sub E}) with constant density and constant radiated power; (2) we have demonstrated real-time disruption detection and mitigation for vertical disruption events using high pressure gas jet injection of noble gases; (3) we have found that the heat and particle fluxes to the inner strike points of balanced, double-null divertors are much smaller than to the outer strike points. We have made detailed investigations of the edge pedestal and scrape-off layer (SOL): (1) atomic physics and plasma physics both play significant roles in setting the width of the edge density barrier in H-mode; (2) ELM heat flux conducted to the divertor decreases as density increases; (3) intermittent, bursty transport contributes to cross field particle transport in the SOL of H-mode and, especially, L-mode plasmas.« less
  • Improvements to the DIII-D tokamak have led to significant new research results and enhanced performance. These results provide important inputs to the design of next generation divertor systems including the upgrade of the DIII-D divertor. The use of graphite for the plasma facing components and careful wall preparation has enabled the routine achievement of regimes of enhanced energy confinement. In elongated discharges, triangularity has been found to be important in attaining good discharge performance as measured by the product of the normalized plasma pressure and the energy confinement time, {beta}{tau}{sub E} This constrains the design of the divertor configuration (X-pointmore » location). Active pumping of the divertor region using an in-situ toroidal cryogenic pump has demonstrated control of the plasma density in H-mode discharges and allowed the dependence of confinement on plasma density and current to be separately determined. Helium removal from the plasma edge sufficient to achieve effective ash removal in reactor discharges has also been demonstrated using this pumping configuration. The reduction of the heat flux to the divertor plates has been demonstrated using two different techniques to increase the radiation in the boundary regions of the plasma and thus reduce the heat flux to the divertor plates; deuterium gas injection has been used to create a strongly radiating localized zone near the X-point, and impurity (neon) injection to enhance the radiation from the plasma mantle. Precise shaping of the plasma current profile has been found to be important in achieving enhanced tokamak performance. Transiently shaped current profiles have been used to demonstrate regimes of plasmas with high beta and good confinement. Control of the current profile also is important to sustaining the plasma in the Very High (VH)-mode of energy confinement.« less
  • The goal of the DIII-D program is to provide the integrated basis for commercially attractive steady state fusion power plants. Significant progress toward this goal has been achieved, enabled by system improvements including an error field correction coil, an expanded diagnostic set, a digital plasma control system, and high power rf systems. Simultaneous improvements in both the confinement and stability have been achieved during both VH-mode and negative central shear discharges. Fully non-inductive discharges with high bootstrap current fraction have been obtained. The divertor program has demonstrated simultaneous reduction of divertor heat flux and effective particle control using gas puffingmore » and an in-vessel cryopump. Control of the wall particle inventory, He exhaust, and characterization of the scrapeoff layer and divertor plasma have been achieved. Progress has also been made in addressing additional specific needs for ITER: investigation of basic transport scaling, disruption characterization and avoidance, material erosion, and steady state beta limits.« less
  • The goal of the DIII-D program is to provide the integrated basis for commercially attractive steady state fusion power plants. Significant progress toward this goal has been achieved, enabled by system improvements including an error field correction coil, an expanded diagnostic set, a digital plasma control system, and high power rf systems. Simultaneous improvements in both the confinement and stability have been achieved during both VH-mode and negative central shear discharges. Fully non-inductive discharges with high bootstrap current fraction have been obtained. The divertor program has demonstrated simultaneous reduction of divertor heat flux and effective particle control using gas puffingmore » and an in-vessel cryopump. Control of the wall particle inventory, He exhaust, and characterization of the scrapeoff layer and divertor plasma have been achieved. Progress has also been made in addressing additional specific needs for ITER: investigation of basic transport scaling, disruption characterization and avoidance, material erosion, and steady state beta limits.« less