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Title: AISI/DOE Technology Roadmap Program: Characterization of Fatigue and Crash Performance of New Generation High Strength Steels for Automotive Applications

Abstract

A 2-year project (2001-2002) to generate fatigue and high strain data for a new generation of high strength steels (HSS) has been completed in December 2002. The project tested eleven steel grades, including Dual Phase (DP) steels, Transformation-Induced Plasticity (TRIP) steels, Bake Hardenable (BH) steels, and conventional High Strength Low Alloy (HSLA) steels. All of these steels are of great interest in automotive industry due to the potential benefit in weight reduction, improved fuel economy, enhanced crash energy management and total system cost savings. Fatigue behavior includes strain controlled fatigue data notch sensitivity for high strength steels. High strain rate behavior includes stress-strain data for strain rates from 0.001/s to 1000/s, which are considered the important strain rate ranges for crash event. The steels were tested in two phases, seven were tested in Phase 1 and the remaining steels were tested in Phase. In a addition to the fatigue data and high st rain rate data generated for the steels studied in the project, analyses of the testing results revealed that Advanced High Strength Steels (AHSS) exhibit significantly higher fatigue strength and crash energy absorption capability than conventional HSS. TRIP steels exhibit exceptionally better fatigue strength than steels of similarmore » tensile strength but different microstructure, for conditions both with or without notches present« less

Authors:
;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
American Iron Steel Incorporated (US)
Sponsoring Org.:
(US)
OSTI Identifier:
812199
Report Number(s):
DOE/ID/13554
TRN: US200313%%163
DOE Contract Number:  
FC07-97ID13554
Resource Type:
Technical Report
Resource Relation:
Other Information: PBD: 21 Apr 2003
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
36 MATERIALS SCIENCE; ALLOYS; AUTOMOTIVE INDUSTRY; ENERGY ABSORPTION; MICROSTRUCTURE; PERFORMANCE; PLASTICITY; STEELS; STRAIN RATE; TENSILE PROPERTIES; MATERIALS TESTING; FATIGUE

Citation Formats

Yan, Brenda, and Urban, Dennis. AISI/DOE Technology Roadmap Program: Characterization of Fatigue and Crash Performance of New Generation High Strength Steels for Automotive Applications. United States: N. p., 2003. Web. doi:10.2172/812199.
Yan, Brenda, & Urban, Dennis. AISI/DOE Technology Roadmap Program: Characterization of Fatigue and Crash Performance of New Generation High Strength Steels for Automotive Applications. United States. doi:10.2172/812199.
Yan, Brenda, and Urban, Dennis. Mon . "AISI/DOE Technology Roadmap Program: Characterization of Fatigue and Crash Performance of New Generation High Strength Steels for Automotive Applications". United States. doi:10.2172/812199. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/812199.
@article{osti_812199,
title = {AISI/DOE Technology Roadmap Program: Characterization of Fatigue and Crash Performance of New Generation High Strength Steels for Automotive Applications},
author = {Yan, Brenda and Urban, Dennis},
abstractNote = {A 2-year project (2001-2002) to generate fatigue and high strain data for a new generation of high strength steels (HSS) has been completed in December 2002. The project tested eleven steel grades, including Dual Phase (DP) steels, Transformation-Induced Plasticity (TRIP) steels, Bake Hardenable (BH) steels, and conventional High Strength Low Alloy (HSLA) steels. All of these steels are of great interest in automotive industry due to the potential benefit in weight reduction, improved fuel economy, enhanced crash energy management and total system cost savings. Fatigue behavior includes strain controlled fatigue data notch sensitivity for high strength steels. High strain rate behavior includes stress-strain data for strain rates from 0.001/s to 1000/s, which are considered the important strain rate ranges for crash event. The steels were tested in two phases, seven were tested in Phase 1 and the remaining steels were tested in Phase. In a addition to the fatigue data and high st rain rate data generated for the steels studied in the project, analyses of the testing results revealed that Advanced High Strength Steels (AHSS) exhibit significantly higher fatigue strength and crash energy absorption capability than conventional HSS. TRIP steels exhibit exceptionally better fatigue strength than steels of similar tensile strength but different microstructure, for conditions both with or without notches present},
doi = {10.2172/812199},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {2003},
month = {4}
}